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Local insurance agency partners with Peabody high school to launch distracted driving program

Posted by Terri Ogan  February 1, 2013 03:06 PM

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In an effort to raise awareness on the dangers of texting and driving, a Danvers insurance company is helping to launch a first-of-its-kind distracted driving program at Peabody High School.

The Citizens Raising Awareness for Accidents, Safety, and Hazards (CRAASH) program, as well as Phil Richard Insurance of Danvers, will host a school-wide program on Tuesday February 5 in the Peabody High School auditorium at 12:15 p.m.

The program will include a mini play performed by the drama club, comments from sheriff’s deputies from the Middleton Jail, personal and emotional stories regarding the issue told by members of the community and a graphic video depicting the tragic consequences that can result from texting while driving.

“This is an event like none other that we hope will have a dramatic impact on students,” said Phil Richard of Phil Richard Insurance, in announcement this week. “They will be able to see, hear and even feel the tragic consequences of distracted driving and the widespread pain it inflicts not just to the driver but all who love them. We need to drive the point home in a way that will result in a shift in these texting behaviors.”

Richard added that he hopes this will be the first of many programs used at various schools in the area to raise awareness to the problem.

This event will have a longstanding impact on the high school students and put things into perspective, said Joseph Mastrocola, the Peabody public schools superintendent.

The CRAASH program is aimed at lowering and eventually eliminating the number of fatal crashes due to texting while driving.

“It’s our responsibility to continue to educate our students about that risk because one mistake can not only hurt their lives, but the lives of others,” Mastrocola added. “At such a young promising age we don’t want that to happen.”

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