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Revere teens win $1,000 in school breakfast video contest

Posted by Christina Jedra  June 4, 2013 10:20 AM

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The following was submitted by Project Bread: 

Revere High School teens were delighted to learn they won the school breakfast video contest, “School Breakfast: Eat. Film. Screen,” sponsored by Project Bread and the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (MDESE). The first place video, “Why YOU Should Eat a Healthy Breakfast,” was created by Lyba Khan, Denis Ortiz, and Dennis Mejia, all freshmen in the school’s media club, under the direction of club advisor, Paul Amato, and monitor, Mary Ellen Dakin. The video team edged out 39 other competitors and won $1,000 for their efforts.

“I wanted to make something everyone can to relate to,” says Khan, who was the director of this upbeat video featuring messages from students engaged in a wide range of extracurricular activities. Khan took a different slant on why school breakfast is the most important part of the day by demonstrating that a good breakfast helps you perform better in cheerleading, basketball, chorus, and dance. Because the video will be used to promote the school breakfast program throughout the state, she wanted it to appeal to a wide range of student interests.

The Revere students won for creativity, style, and effective messaging. In addition to the $1,000 gift card for the media club and they will appear on the WHDH-TV show, “Urban Update.” 

The contest began in March, when students were asked to submit a 30-second video PSA promoting the benefits of school breakfast and encouraging peers to eat a healthy breakfast before classes begin. The videos were uploaded to SchoolTube.com, a safe online space for teachers and students to share media, and the public voted on the videos.

“We are very grateful to Project Bread and the MDESE for the opportunity to participate in this contest,” says Paul Amato, the Media Club Advisor at Revere High School who instructed the three freshmen in the project. “We will use the prize money to purchase better equipment. I hope that our winning this competition will encourage more students to get involved in the Media Club and so we can grow our program.” 

In its third year, the contest received 40 entries from middle and high schools across Massachusetts. Sharon High School’s “Stop Action School Breakfast” was the second place winner, receiving a prize of $300, and showing a student eating a healthy breakfast in the cafeteria using a clever stop-action effect. Randolph High School came in third place, receiving a $200 gift card for its “Eat Your Breakfast” message using high energy hip hop music.

“Students need to be both full and healthy to learn and thrive,” says Ellen Parker, executive director of Project Bread. “Nutritious school breakfast programs are a vital resource for them—and there’s no one better to send that message to students than another student.”

Revere High School.jpgPaul Amato, Revere High School media club advisor with students Lyba Khan, Dennis Mejia, Denis Ortiz, and Mary Ellen Dakin, media club monitor, receive a $1,000 check for winning the statewide school breakfast video contest sponsored by Project Bread and the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.


About Project Bread
Project Bread is the only statewide antihunger organization committed to providing people of all ages, cultures, and walks of life with sustainable, reliable access to nutritious food. From community-based meal programs, to early childhood and school nutrition initiatives, to improved access to farm-to-table resources, Project Bread approaches hunger as a complex problem with multiple solutions. With funds raised through The Walk for Hunger, the oldest continual pledge walk in the country, and other sources, Project Bread pioneers innovative initiatives and supports effective programs to eradicate hunger in our state. For more information, visit www.projectbread.org, www.facebook.com/projectbread, or www.twitter.com/walkforhunger. 

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