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Scituate picks up after second serious storm

Posted by Jessica Bartlett  November 9, 2012 03:24 PM

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Town officials say the cleanup of Scituate’s streets is well under way after the second serious storm to hit the town in as many weeks.

Already, power has been restored to the approximately 150 National Grid customers who had lines knocked down by winds during the Nor’easter that swept through the coastal community on Thursday.

Overwash from the storm caused a significant build-up in debris in parts of Scituate, specifically along Central Avenue in Humarock.

“I was down there today, there are piles of sand that has been piled up with a front end loader all along Central Avenue,” said Scitaute police Lieutenant Dave Egan. “There was quite a bit of wash-over.”

According to Selectmen Chairman Joseph Norton, the Department of Public Works has its hands full with cleaning up around town, removing downed trees from roadways.

While the sand has already been removed from the roadway alongside Humarock houses, putting it back on the beach will come next. “It’s just a matter of getting to it. There were a lot downed trees yesterday around town, and DPW’s first objective was to clear the roads and get trees off the roads,” Norton said.

The town will take care of sand piled alongside public roads, but private way residents will be responsible for doing their own cleanup, Norton said.

“As far as I know, [the cleanup of sand] will be on public streets unless the road is impassable, but I don’t know of any situations of private roads that are impassable… if it’s a safety issue, the town will do everything it can to make the road safe and passable,” Norton said.

Overall, however, flooding was minimal, Norton said.

And while there were fewer power outages than during Sandy, the winds did bring down numerous trees and wires.

“There were gusts during the hurricane of 50-55 [mph], but yesterday was sustained winds of 40s. They weren’t quite as strong, but continuous,” Norton said.

According to Egan, winds started to die down around midnight, and police crews are no longer standing by at any downed wires, meaning they are being repaired or have been repaired already, he said.

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