THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING
< Back to front page Text size +

Petitions seek to save South Boston neighborhood properties

Posted by Patrick Rosso  March 25, 2013 06:28 PM

E-mail this article

Invalid E-mail address
Invalid E-mail address

Sending your article

South Boston residents are pushing back against proposed residential projects slated to go before the Boston Landmarks Commission for demolition review.

At recent community meetings many from the neighborhood have said the properties hold historic and sentimental value.

A petition has been started to block the demolition of the St. Augustine’s Church and School located on E Street and Dorchester Street.

Separate petitions have also been started to protest the proposed demolition of a house at 928 East Broadway.

Although the application for the demolition of the St. Augustine’s Church has been withdrawn and developers have said they will look at ways to rehabilitate the aging structure, they will still be pushing ahead with the review process for the demolition of the school located at 205 E St.

A public hearing before the Boston Landmarks Commission will be held Wed., March 27, starting at 5:45 p.m. at City Hall to review the application. Public comments will be taken at the meeting.

The Demolition Review process slows down any potential project that seeks to demolish a structure older than 50-years until a community process has been conducted and the Commission’s board has reviewed the project.

In place of the school developers have proposed constructing two three-story buildings for 48 two-bedroom condominium units and 64 underground parking spaces.

While the school holds significance for many, it is not a designated landmark and the majority of neighborhood concern has surrounded the church at 225 Dorchester St., which is also not a designated landmark.

Developers at a recent community meeting said they will look to rehab the church, originally constructed in 1874, and potentially fill it with 25 two-bedroom condominium units.

An online petition to “Save St. Augustine’s” has been started and has received 117 signatures, with many residents leaving comments about the importance of the structure to the community and Catholics.

The church and school were closed in 2004 by the Archdiocese of Boston because of mounting financial pressures. Since then, the church has sat unused and in deteriorating shape, stripped of its altars, pews, stained glass, and other property by the Archdiocese.


928 East Broadway

Residents are also rallying around the proposed demolition of the property at 928 East Broadway to make way for eleven condominium units.

So far two petitions circulating in the community have received close to a total of 300 signatures. One online petition has received 161 signatures so far.

The house, which was constructed in the 1860s, sits on a 15,625-square-foot lot currently owned by Charles Shilas, according to the city’s Assessing Department.

Shilas was unable to be reached for comment.

In 2007 the single-family property, a former rooming house, was put up for sale with an asking price of $3.1-million, according to the Boston Business Journal.

It was assessed for close to $1.1-million in 2013.

Boasting 8,690-square-feet of living space, the Journal said the three-floor home has 22-rooms in the main house with a separate three-unit structure located in the rear of the lot.

Known as the James Collins Mansion, the property was one of the first significant residential structures to be built in South Boston’s City Point neighborhood and helped define the neighborhood, according Robert Allison of the South Boston Historical Society,

A public hearing before the Boston Landmarks Commission will be held Wed., Apr. 9, starting at 5:45 p.m. at City Hall to review the demolition application. Public comments will be taken at the meeting.


---
Email Patrick D. Rosso, patrick.d.rosso@gmail.com. Follow him @PDRosso, or friend him on Facebook.

E-mail this article

Invalid E-mail address
Invalid E-mail address

Sending your article