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Coppersmith Hall, The Ginger Man seek liquor licensies

Posted by Patrick Rosso  February 12, 2014 02:58 PM

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A new restaurant promising interesting décor and a family-friendly atmosphere could soon call West 3rd Street in South Boston home.

The proponents of Coppersmith Hall appeared before the Boston Licensing Board Wednesday morning, seeking approval to transfer a liquor license to the eatery proposed for 40 West 3rd St. The license, expected to cost $290,000, according to the proponents, would come from the now-closed Remington's, which was on Boylston Street.

The South Boston property, which is currently vacant, once housed a machine shop. It would be renovated for the new use that John Childs, one of the owners, said aims to be welcoming, warm, and to provide high-quality food at a low cost.

After the hearing, Childs said the space could be open by early summer.

The proposal calls for a 250-seat restaurant, including a 60-seat outdoor patio space. The project also includes the addition of a 20-car parking lot.

Although the prospect of a new restaurant along the sleepy street has attracted attention, it’s the concept that sets it apart.

There would be a main kitchen, but the large interior space would also house two food trucks. Although the food trucks would not be mobile, they would provide the restaurant with space for cook-offs, functions, and additional menu items.

“It’s bridging the gap between the food truck community and the restaurateurs,” Childs told the board.

At Wednesday’s hearing, Childs and his attorney, Michael Brodigan, laid out the details of the proposal.

The restaurant and patio are anticipated to open at 6 a.m. and close at 1 a.m. In the morning the establishment would cater to the café crowd, with coffee and other breakfast-type offerings.

During the afternoon the restaurant would offer a number of lunch items, including premade meals and meals prepared by the food trucks. During the evening the restaurant would offer a full dinner menu.

The restaurant had originally sought a 2 a.m. closing time, but after working with the adjacent St. Vincent’s Lower End Neighborhood Association, the hours were rolled back to 1 a.m.

“The vision my clients have for this property, is to provide an amenity for the neighborhood,” Brodigan told the board.

At Wednesday’s hearing, representatives from the Mayor’s Office of Neighborhood Services, the offices’ of at-Large City Councilors Stephen Murphy, Michelle Wu, Michael Flaherty, Ayanna Pressley, and the office of Councilor Bill Linehan voiced their support for the license transfer.

A handful of members of the West Broadway Neighborhood Association also turned out to support the proposal, with one saying the group supports a 2 a.m. closing.

The board will decide Thursday whether to approve, deny, or defer a decision on the license transfer.

To read about the proponent’s presentation before the West Broadway Neighborhood Association, click here.

The Ginger Man

The Ginger Man, a tavern proposed to open on Congress Street in the spring, was before the Boston Licensing Wednesday morning, seeking approval to transfer a liquor license to the establishment.

The license, estimated to cost $300,000, would come from the now closed Purple Shamrock, which was located in Downtown Boston.

Anticipated to seat close to 200 patrons in the main dining room and on a small patio, the tavern, which would be located at 374 Congress St., is expected to focus on its beer and lunch-style food. The first Ginger Man opened in 1985 and it has locations in Texas as well as New York and Connecticut.

Although the new restaurant would not have a full dinner menu, the food is expected to be handmade and seek to compliment the 50 to 60 beers anticipated to be on tap.

At Wednesday’s hearing, Matthew Fogelman, the proponent’s attorney, told the board that The Ginger Man has been looking to open a location in Massachusetts for some time.

“We’re very excited to come to Massachusetts,” Fogelman said. “He’s [Bob Precious, the owner of The Ginger Man] has been looking for an opportunity in Massachusetts for some time, and I think we’ve found the location.”

This is the businesses’ second attempt to open a restaurant in the Fort Point. Precious had tried to open up a location on Farnsworth Street nearly two years ago, but according to Precious, the fit wasn’t right.

The restaurant's hours are expected to be 11 a.m./11:30 a.m. to 2 a.m. with the patio expected to close at either 11 p.m. or 12 a.m. The restaurant’s kitchen is expected to be open until 11 p.m./12 a.m. something neighbors encouraged at a recent community meeting.

“The neighborhood has taken off in the past few years with businesses as well as new residents and I don’t think there’s a place like this in the neighborhood or the city,” Fogelman said.

The restaurant, however, will not be perusing its initial plans to sell to-go six-packs or growlers. While other Ginger Man locations do, Fogelman said it is unlikely that it would be allowed in Boston.

At Wednesday’s hearing, representatives from the Mayor’s Office of Neighborhood Services, the offices’ of at-Large City Councilors Stephen Murphy, Michael Flaherty, Ayanna Pressley and the office of City Councilor Bill Linehan voiced their support for the license transfer.

The board will decide Thursday whether to approve, deny, or defer a decision on the license transfer.

To read about the proponent’s presentation before the Fort Point Neighborhood Association, click here.

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Email Patrick D. Rosso, patrick.d.rosso@gmail.com. Follow him @PDRosso, or friend him on Facebook.

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