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I didn't hear you

Posted by Christina Jedra  March 28, 2013 10:00 AM

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The following was submitted by Loleata Wigall, Atlantic Audiology: 

I didn’t hear you!

“What did you say?”   “Could you repeat that please?”    “Huh?” 

We’ve all said these things to our family and friends.  We’ve all heard our spouse’s voice from the other room and had no idea what they were saying.  We’ve all heard a young child look up at us, say something, but we had no idea what was said.  We’ve heard a waitress say the specials, but really didn’t understand what she was saying.  

We’ve sat in church and not really heard or understood the sermon.  How about watching a TV show, and not being able to understand some of the dialogue?  

All these situations have probably happened to most people.  But, how can you tell if it is because you weren’t paying attention, or if you have a hearing loss?  Was it because the speaker mumbled?  Is it because the restaurant is so noisy, it is impossible to really hear the waitress? 

Not hearing another person can be due to inattention.  Reading a good book can be relaxing.  But, then someone asks you a question.  You look up and say, “What?”  Did you say “what” because you really didn’t hear them, or did you not really understand them because you were concentrating on the book?  Or, do you have a hearing loss? 

Many people complain they cannot always understand the minister.  My usual suggestion is to move closer to the pulpit to be able to be able to see the pastor’s lips better and to hear better.  However, many pastors talk too fast. 

 When a microphone and speakers are involved, the speaker should talk slower.  There is a delay in any speaker system.  If the pastor speaks more slowly, it gives the audience a better chance to hear what is being said.  I understand that when you speak in public, adrenalin kicks in.  But, the speaker should speak slower than normal so the audience can truly hear what is being said.  But, even if the pastor speaks slowly, and you still don’t hear what is being said, do you have a hearing loss?

The only real way to know if you have a hearing loss is to have a hearing test.  An audiologist is a trained professional who tests hearing.  The good news is most medical insurance policies cover the cost of a hearing test.  

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