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Local museum to host art exhibit by Phish bassist

Posted by Jaclyn Reiss  August 25, 2011 03:23 PM

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The Charles River Museum of Industry and Innovation in Waltham will host a multimedia plastics art exhibit in September produced by a team of three artists, including Phish bassist Mike Gordon.

The exhibit, "Another Side of In," blends the plastic Lexan with light and sound software for an interactive experience, according to the museum's email alert.

Gordon drew inspiration and customized sound clips for the exhibit from his recent album, Inside In, according to the exhibit's website.

Marjorie Minkin, Gordon's mother and visual artist, used molded Lexan to create relief works for the looped sounds while listening to them, while Jamie Robertson, creative technologist and musician, designed and built the wireless electronics to enable viewers to interact with sound and light on each piece through proximity with the works, according to the site.

"Mike and I have long planned a collaboration of his music and my visual art that would involve viewers in a multimedia experience," Minkin said in a prepared statement. "The release of his album Inside In was the catalyst for us to begin our joint creation. Working on my art while listening to Mike's custom designed sounds extracted from his album was inspirational and challenging for me. Responding to the 'colors' and 'textures' of his sounds, I created a group of painted molded Lexan relief works resembling abstract torsos."

Since its invention in 1953, Lexan has been adapted by many industries, including aerospace and technology encasing, according to the statement.

"I am attracted to Lexan because of the incredible impact it has had on our society," Minkin said. "I also loved the fact that as an artist it gave me a translucent archival strong material to express my love of color."

The technological wiring aspect followed technology based on Polaroid's Visitor Conversation System. Each piece gauges the distance between itself and the visitor, and then relays that information to other software using wireless technology similar to Bluetooth, which in turn controls the lighting and sound both inside the pieces and within the exhibit, the statement said.

"The technology works similar to how a bat sees," Robertson said in the statement.

The museum will display the exhibit from Sept. 11 through Dec. 23, 2011.

The museum will host a free opening reception on Sept. 13, from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Light refreshments will be served.


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To contact Jaclyn Reiss, email her at jaclyn.reiss@gmail.com

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