THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING
< Back to front page Text size +

Apparent bloodstains found at Nathaniel Fujita's home, trooper testifies at murder trial

Posted by Leslie Anderson  February 20, 2013 12:07 PM

E-mail this article

Invalid E-mail address
Invalid E-mail address

Sending your article

When police searched Nathaniel Fujita’s home in the days following the 2011 slaying of his former girlfriend, they found what appeared to be bloodstains in the kitchen and bathroom, as well as a reddish brown stain on the floor of the garage, a State Police trooper testified.

Trooper David Twomey continued his testimony Wednesday in the trial of Fujita, who is charged with first-degree murder in the July 3, 2011 death of Lauren Astley after the two had recently graduated from Wayland High School.

Prosecutors say Fujita planned to strangle and slash the neck of his former girlfriend because he was humiliated by their breakup.

Fujita’s lawyer is presenting an insanity defense, saying that Fujita had a psychotic episode and did not understand what he was doing when Astley came to his home on the evening of July 3.

During testimony Tuesday in Middlesex Superior Court, Twomey said he took photos and video at the Water Row area when Astley’s body was removed and saw a gaping slash mark on her neck. He was also present during the search of the Fujita family home in the days after the slaying.

Twomey testified seeing a reddish brown stain on the floor of the garage, where police also found bungee cords and a white garbage can with reddish brown spots. A “reddish brown substance” was also found on a rear window of a gold Honda Civic that was registered to the Fujita family, Twomey said.

There was blood on the floor and sink of the kitchen and in the tub and sink in an upstairs bathroom, Twomey said. Several liquor bottles and beer cans were found in Fujita’s bedroom, the trooper said.

Fujita faces charges of first-degree murder, two counts of assault and battery with a dangerous weapon, and one count of assault and battery. If convicted, he faces life in prison without parole. If he is found not guilty because of lack of criminal responsibility, he will be committed indefinitely.

E-mail this article

Invalid E-mail address
Invalid E-mail address

Sending your article