Local

Pride Month 2021: What helped you see the rainbow after the storm?

We want to hear your stories of connection, healing, and ambition for the future of your community.

What helped you see the rainbow after the storm? Share your stories of connection, healing, and ambition for the future of your community with Boston.com. Pat Greenhouse/Globe Staff

This year’s Boston Pride theme, “The Rainbow After the Storm,” is a fitting one for a Pride month that comes after a year that has been difficult for the LGBTQ+ community. 

Although many Pride events in the city and surrounding areas will be virtual this year due to the ongoing pandemic, organizers of Boston Pride and members of the LGBTQ+ community are using this month to reflect on the hardships of the past year while looking forward to the progress that lays ahead. 

Pierce Durkin, the director of operations for Boston Pride, said the community-nominated theme was appropriate. 

“We’ve gone through the sorrow, the upheaval, the pain, and unfortunately the deaths that have occurred in our community,” Durkin said. 

The community faced a number of hard losses over the year. Last month, Jahaira DeAlto, a transgender woman of color and well-known activist, was fatally stabbed in Boston. Mikayla Miller, a Black LGBTQ+ teenager, was also found dead in Hopkinton earlier this year. Police ruled her death a suicide, but her family and local advocates have rejected the investigation’s finding.

LGBTQ+ youth face high rates of violence and bullying and for transgender women of color like DeAlto, rates of violence and discrimination are also devastatingly high. There are currently more than 80 bills in state legislatures across the country that specifically target trans people, according to Durkin. 

“If there’s anything that is completely evident in the last 12 months is that Black and brown people are disproportionately discriminated against. And then there are people in the transgender community and the gender non-conforming community that are also experiencing regular violence,” he said. 

Advertisement:

This year’s Pride may look different than previous years, said Durkin, but “it could still be a time where the community can come together and support each other and heal from the events of the past year while committing to continue to work as a community towards acceptance, justice and understanding.” 

This Pride month, we want to share the joy, hope, and activism of the LGBTQ+ community and its allies. Tell us, what helped you see the rainbow after the storm? We want to hear your stories of connection, healing, and ambition for the future of your community.

If you’re a member of the LGBTQ+ community or an ally, please fill out the survey below or e-mail us at [email protected], and we’ll share your responses in a future Boston.com article.

Jump To Comments

Conversation

This discussion has ended. Please join elsewhere on Boston.com