11 beaches you can get to via public transportation

You don’t need a car to get to the beach. Here are New England beaches that are accessible by public transportation.

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1. Revere Beach, Mass.

The 2-mile beach is a magnet for hordes of sunbathers and beach lovers who have access to a public bathhouse and, for those who want sea air but no burn, Victorian-style pavilions.

How to get there: MBTA Blue Line to Wonderland station. Short walk to beach.

Carson Beach
Carson Beach —Melissa Malamut

2. Carson Beach, Boston

In terms of quick trips for city dwellers, Carson Beach is like Revere Beach in that it is a short walk from the Red Line’s JFK-UMass station.

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How to get there: Walk from JFK-UMass on MBTA’s Red Line as well as the Middleborough/Lakeville and Plymouth-Kingston commuter lines.

The pier at Old Orchard Beach, Maine
The pier at Old Orchard Beach, Maine —Shutterstock / Jon Bilous

3. Old Orchard Beach, Maine

This venerable shore town wins the easy-rider award because the Amtrak Downeaster train platform is a two-minute walk from the beach. The Boston-to-Portland train, which began summer service here in 2003, stops at the beach April 1 to Oct. 31. Passengers disembark at the First Street platform, and from there, it’s just a two-block walk to the Atlantic and the impressive 7-mile beach.

How to get there: Amtrak Downeaster from Boston to First Street platform daily through October. Leaves from North Station and Woburn and Haverhill in Massachusetts.

 

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4. Easton’s Beach (First Beach), Newport, R.I.

Easton’s Beach sits below the start of the 3 1/2-mile Cliff Walk that winds westward in front of the Gilded Age mansions. It’s a city beach with nearby residential neighborhoods and a small commercial district with the Inn at Newport Beach, Flo’s Clam Shack, and other nearby places to eat. The Atlantic Beach Club and Pavilion is on the beach with volleyballers playing their games in front of the restaurant parking lot and outdoor patio.

How to get there: RIPTA trolley No. 61 leaves from Newport’s Gateway Visitors Center on America’s Cup Avenue daily from late June to mid August. To get to the Gateway center, take Peter Pan Bus lines from Boston’s South Station.

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5. Sachuest (Second Beach), Middletown, R.I.

Sachuest is a city beach without the city because there’s no development around it even though it’s only 2 miles from Easton’s. Instead of mansions, it is surrounded by the Norman Bird Sanctuary and Sachuest Point National Wildlife Refuge. High dunes, beach grass, and roses line the road and parking lot. The mile-long sandy beach is bookended by giant rock formations, and has basic facilities for showers and concessions.

How to get there: RIPTA trolley No. 61 leaves from Newport’s Gateway Visitors Center on America’s Cup Avenue daily from late June to mid August. To get to the Gateway center, take Peter Pan Bus lines from Boston’s South Station.

 

Sand Hill Cove Beach
Narragansett Beach —Flickr/erikasmith

6. Narragansett Town Beach, Narragansett, R.I.

The Ocean State’s version of “surf city’’ sets aside an area for surfers. Their competitions run through Labor Day weekend. Beach facilities also include two pavilions, cabanas, showers and a beach front club house available for rent.

How to get there: RIPTA bus No. 14 from Providence’s Kennedy Plaza to Town Beach.

 

7. Scarborough Beach State Park, Point Judith, R.I.

You’ll hear the waves before you see them at this Atlantic Ocean haven. When the water comes into view, little Rhody lives up to the Ocean State nickname. The sandy landscape changes daily because of the waves here.

How to get there: The RIPTA Beach Bus to South County every day from late June to mid August.

Our 3rd stop – Connecticut⚓️ #connecticut #beach #roadtrip #newlondon

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8. Ocean Beach Park, New London, Conn.

Considered one of Connecticut’s best public beaches, the complex also includes an Olympic-size swimming pool, 10 amusement park rides, playgrounds, a miniature golf course, even a workout center. Admission is $5; the rides and other attractions have additional charges.

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How to get there: Take Amtrak’s Northeast Corridor trains from Boston’s South Station to the New London transportation center, then take SEAT (Southeast Area Transit) Bus No. 13. Park is about 3 1/2 miles from the station. Greyhound buses from Boston and other Northeast cities also stop at Transportation Center.

 

#capecod #provincetown #driftwood #driftwoodbeach #herringcove #lifesabeach

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9. Herring Cove Beach, Provincetown, Mass. 

Herring Cove is closest to town and provides the bare bones for a day at the beach. TA concession stand sells foods on weekends and daily starting at the end of this month. A blacktopped path overlooks the sloping beach for walkers who don’t want the sand running through their toes. Lifeguards are on duty here and at Race Point from later this month through Labor Day.

How to get there: Regular and high-speed ferries from Boston: Bay State Cruises leaves from World Trade Center, Northern Avenue (617-748-1428, boston-ptown.com); Boston Harbor Cruises leaves from Long Wharf (617-227-4321, bostonharborcruises.com); Plymouth & Brockton bus from Boston and other points (508-746-0378, p-b.com). Boats and buses arrive at MacMillan Wharf. From here, take The Breeze shuttle to Herring Cove Beach.

 

Sunrise this morning captured by @magri_photography ! #lifeoncapecod

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10. Race Point Beach, Provincetown, Mass. 

Race Point Beach is wide open, stretching out from some of the highest dunes. You have to navigate the shifting sands for the long climb. Like Herring Cove, Race Point has the basics: simple bathhouse and restrooms. The Old Harbor Life-Saving Station Museum sits on a high point overlooking the wide Atlantic.

How to get there: Regular and high-speed ferries from Boston: Bay State Cruises leaves from World Trade Center, Northern Avenue (617-748-1428, boston-ptown.com); Boston Harbor Cruises leaves from Long Wharf (617-227-4321, bostonharborcruises.com); Plymouth & Brockton bus from Boston and other points (508-746-0378, p-b.com). Boats and buses arrive at MacMillan Wharf. From here, take The Breeze shuttle to Race Point Beach.

 

Tis the season #MDW 🇺🇸 #Summer #Beach

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11. Singing Beach, Manchester-by-the-Sea, Mass. 

Singing Beach gets its name from the unique squeaking sound your feet make as you walk through the fine sand. This beach is the perfect combination of seclusion, water, and scenic atmosphere, making it one of the most popular beaches on the North Shore. The beach is great for walking around or collecting shells or jumping in the waves. Lifeguards are on duty from Memorial Day to Labor Day.

How to get there: Singing Beach is within walking distance of the Manchester Depot MBTA commuter rail stop.

 

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