Thousands walked up to the entire marathon route Sunday in Boston. Here’s why.

The walk raises more money than any ofter single-day walk in the nation and has raised more than $135 million since its start.

The 2014 Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk drew names such as Mo Vaughn, and teams such as “Team Ari,’’ of Newton. Two-year-old Ari rode on the shoulders of his dad Matt Goldwasser. His mom JulieSue Goldwasser carried 1-year-old Alison Goldwasser.
The 2014 Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk drew names such as Mo Vaughn, and teams such as “Team Ari,’’ of Newton. Two-year-old Ari rode on the shoulders of his dad Matt Goldwasser. His mom JulieSue Goldwasser carried 1-year-old Alison Goldwasser. –Pat Greenhouse/Globe Staff

Around 9,000 people walked up to an entire marathon Sunday to raise money for cancer research and care. Many followed the 26.2-mile Boston Marathon route, and all of the walkers finished at Copley Square.

The Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk, which raises money for the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, celebrated its 31st year this weekend. In 2018, more than 8,000 walkers participated, raising more than $8.5 million.

The goal for the 2019 walk was to raise $9 million. Fundraising will continue through the end of October.

Participants chose between walking a 5k, 10k, half marathon, or full marathon. Boston was a little chilly Sunday morning when the first participants took off, but the day quickly warmed up.

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The course was lined with signs bearing the smiling faces of “Jimmy Fund Walk Heroes.” The group included Dana-Faber patients past and present. Some signs were in memoriam, some were dedicated to patients currently battling cancer, and some celebrated those who beat the disease.

The first sign at mile 0.5 featured 2-year-old Kadin. Seven-year-old Nixon marked mile 26.

According to its website, the walk raises more money than any ofter single-day walk in the nation and has raised more than $135 million since its start.

The Jimmy Fund began in 1948 when a national radio show broadcast a hospital visit between a 12-year-old cancer patient called “Jimmy” and the Boston Braves baseball team.

After hearing his story on the air, donors rallied to help buy “Jimmy,” whose name was later revealed to be Einar Gustafon, a television so he could watch the Braves play, according to the fund’s website.

“His story is the story of our nation’s war on cancer, and over the decades, hundreds of thousands of people have rallied against cancer in his name,” Edward J. Benz Jr., former president of Dana-Farber, said in a statement on the site. “We certainly pledge to continue that fight.”

Earlier this month, Jimmy Fund families donned yellow to form a gold ribbon on Fenway Park’s field in recognition of Childhood Cancer Awareness month.

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