Rachel Rollins says prosecutors will fight bail for those charged with firearm offenses

The stance came after a murder allegedly committed by a 26-year-old Roxbury man who was out on bail.

Suffolk District Attorney Rachael Rollins.
Suffolk District Attorney Rachael Rollins. –Craig F. Walker / The Boston Globe, File

Suffolk County District Attorney Rachael Rollins said Monday prosecutors will push to hold defendants charged with firearms offenses without bail as Boston sees a high rate of gun violence this year.

“What we want people to know is there has been a significant uptick in dangerousness hearings that we have been pursuing regarding gun violence, meaning you will not be let out up until your trial,” Rollins said.

Dangerousness hearings, or 58A hearings, require defendants to be held if a judge rules they are too dangerous to release before trial.

The district attorney’s comments come after 26-year-old Uhmari Bufford was arraigned and held without bail for the murder of Augusta Carter, who was killed while Bufford was out on bail on armed robbery charges, The Boston Herald reports.

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Bufford was awaiting trail on charges alleging he robbed a taxi driver last year, according to the newspaper.

He was seen on surveillance video footage at 950 Parker St. in Jamaica Plain approaching and then allegedly shooting Carter several times on Friday, the Herald reports. Bufford was arrested two days later in Brockton.

According to the news outlet, 40 people have died in shootings this year in Boston — a 60 percent increase over the number of fatal shootings at this time last year. Non-fatal shootings have risen by 32 percent compared to 2019.

Since Oct. 21, there have been two homicides and 15 firearm-related arrests, according to Rollins.

“That’s a lot of guns,” she said.

“Rather than the previous practices of other administrations — and even earlier in mine — where some individuals might have been held on a low bail, the commonwealth will be moving for dangerousness,” Rollins added.

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