Crime

11 nabbed in major South Coast drug raid

Law enforcement officials confiscated approximately 450 grams of fentanyl, 550 grams of cocaine, three handguns, three high-capacity magazines, ammunition, and approximately $26,000 in drug proceeds.

Eleven people accused of being part of a major Brockton drug trafficking organization have been arrested as part of a long-term investigation by Attorney General Maura Healey’s New England Fentanyl Strike Force on the South Shore.

The suspects have been accused of distributing fentanyl and crack cocaine throughout Plymouth, Norfolk, and Bristol counties.

Local and state authorities executed search warrants at six narcotics stash houses in Brockton, Stoughton, and Fall River on Tuesday, according to a statement from Healey’s office.

Through these searches, law enforcement officials confiscated approximately 450 grams of fentanyl, 550 grams of cocaine, three handguns, three high-capacity magazines, ammunition, and approximately $26,000 in drug proceeds, the statement noted.

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Djosue Dossantos, 23, of Fall River was charged with trafficking 200 mg or more of cocaine, possession of a large capacity feeding device, unlawful possession of a firearm, unlawful possession of ammunition, and conspiracy to violate the drug laws.

Alexander Munoz-Gomez, 23, of Brockton was charged with trafficking 100 mg or more of cocaine and conspiracy to violate the drug laws.

Jiovoni Alves, 20, of Brockton was charged with trafficking 10 mg or more of fentanyl and possession with intent to distribute cocaine.

Orlando Munoz-Gomez, 25, of Brockton was charged with trafficking 100 mg or more of cocaine and conspiracy to violate the drug laws.

Dossantos, Alves, Alexander Munoz-Gomez, and Orlando Munoz-Gomez were each held without bail pending dangerousness hearings.

Bruno Pires, 20, of Brockton was charged with distribution of class B drugs and conspiracy to violate the drug laws. Pires was held on $3,000 bail and is due back in Brockton District Court on Jan. 12 for a pretrial hearing.

Dylan Santos, 23, of Brockton was charged with possession with intent to distribute fentanyl, trafficking in 18g or more of cocaine, and conspiracy to violate the drug laws. Santos was held on $5,000 bail and is due back in Stoughton District Court on Jan. 19 for a probable cause hearing.

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Jonathan Pires, 24, of Stoughton was charged with trafficking 18g or more of cocaine, possession of intent to distribute fentanyl, and conspiracy to violate the drug laws. Pires was held on $25,000 bail and is due back in Stoughton District Court on Jan. 19 for a probably cause hearing.

Kevin Tavares, 25, of Brockton was charged with trafficking 18g or more of cocaine, possession with intent to distribute fentanyl, and conspiracy to violate the drug laws. Tavares was held on $10,000 bail and is due back in Stoughton District Court on Jan. 19 for a probable cause hearing.

Melisa Pina, 19, of Brockton was charged with trafficking 18g or more of cocaine, possession with intent to distribute fentanyl, and conspiracy to violate the drug laws. Pina was held on $1,000 bail and is due back in Stoughton District Court for a probable cause hearing.

Raul Andrade, 20, of Brockton was charged with trafficking 18g or more of cocaine and conspiracy to violate the drug laws. Andrade was held on $10,000 bail and is due back in Stoughton District Court on Jan. 19 for a probable cause hearing.

Victor Oliveira, 19, of Brockton was charged with trafficking in 18g or more of cocaine, possession with intent to distribute fentanyl, and conspiracy to violate the drug laws. Oliveira was held on $5,000 bail and is due back in Stoughton District Court on Jan. 19 for a probable cause hearing.

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The New England Fentanyl Strike Force, established by the state attorney general’s office, is made up of State Police units and the Brockton and Weymouth police departments.

“The work of our New England Fentanyl Strike Force has been critical in dismantling major drug trafficking networks and keeping our communities safe,” Healey said in a statement. “I’m grateful to our many law enforcement partners for their collaboration and ongoing commitment to taking these deadly drugs off our streets.”

“There is no surer way to ravage neighborhoods, spur violence, and destroy lives than by trafficking deadly narcotics in our communities,” State Police Colonel Christopher Mason noted.

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