Jobs

Logos on resumes and fake job postings

Q: I have several logos on my resume because I have worked for some very well-known companies. I am targeting larger companies with my current job search. I have received mixed feedback on the use of these logos. Some interviewers seem to love it, some seem to hate it. Do you have an opinion? Also, a second question: do you think fake jobs are posted on the internet? Thanks.

A: Sometimes it is difficult to digest, but feedback is a gift. It sounds like interviewers have offered honest opinions regarding your use of logos. The goal of a resume is to provide a summary of your career but also to land you an interview with a prospective employer. If interviewers “hate” your resume, then perhaps they are not sharing your resume with others?

Additionally, sometimes logos can be problematic for resume scanning systems. Large employers often use resume scanning systems. Within these large companies, a resume is scanned into a database which makes a resume much easier to review and then retrieve, if there is interest. Sometimes these scanning systems are a bit particular about what they will accept from a document, especially with respect to formatting. Unusual fonts, photos or logos often present a challenge for resume scanning systems. If a company is using such a system, you want your resume to be one of the resumes which is easily scanned and then hopefully reviewed and retrieved by those responsible for hiring new employees.

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Regarding your second question, I do think fake jobs are posted on the internet but primarily on free or low cost sites. I would be very surprised if fake job postings are rampant on reputable and established sites like Linkedin, Boston.com or Career Builder. Also, the sites I have mentioned require that a company provide basic information about their firm as well as pay a fee to list the job opportunity. I would also be more cautious about “blind” ads, which I define as the job postings which don’t identify a company. There are sometimes reasons for running a “blind” ad but there are risks associated with applying to such an ad, including the one you mention.

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by Pattie Hunt Sinacole

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