Baker Jobs Promises Will Now Take Center Stage

Charlie Baker gestures at his election night party in Boston Massachusetts November 4, 2014. Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff Topic: 05mainbar Reporter:
Charlie Baker gestures at his election night party in Boston Massachusetts November 4, 2014. Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff Topic: 05mainbar Reporter: –JESSICA RINALDI/ THE BOSTON GLOBE

Now that election night is over, what job promises should we be looking forward to from the winners?

Charlie Baker gestures at his election night party in Boston Massachusetts November 4, 2014. Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff Topic: 05mainbar Reporter: —JESSICA RINALDI/ THE BOSTON GLOBE

Democrat Martha Coakley has conceded the Massachusetts gubernatorial race, granting the position to Republican Charlie Baker. Baker has long said unemployment in Massachusetts is too high and his proposed economic plans mean growing small businesses, a minimum wage increase, and increasing the Earned Income Tax Credit.

Baker also staunchly opposes raising taxes and says he’ll “work to reform a tax code that has grown overly complicated–benefiting only special interests while harming workers, families, and small businesses.’’

So, how will he deliver? According to The Boston Globe, Baker promises to “streamline the permitting process for development, phase out the inventory tax, reduce regulatory barriers, and spend more on vocational training.’’

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In addition, Baker’s campaign booklet “Great Again Massachusetts: A New Direction For Prosperity’’ ties his policies on everything from health care, to entrepreneurship, to education with improvements in the workforce.

Sick Leave

Last night, Massachusetts’ voters approved a ballot question that requires companies with at least 11 employees to provide workers with earned paid sick leave.

The law will go into effect July 2015, making workers eligible for an hour of paid time-off every 30 hours worked. Workers can take the time for health related issues, including personal illness or medical appointments, an illness in the family, or to deal with domestic issues, including the repercussions of abuse.

Though Coakley supported the bill, Baker did not. According to WBUR, Baker believed passing mandatory sick leave has the potential to hurt the job market.

Connecticut has a similar law and almost half the state’s business owners say it has had little-to-no effect on profitability or jobs. That said, Connecticut’s law applies to companies with 50 or more people, not 11.

Minimum Wage

At a national level, five states (Arkansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, Alaska and Illinois) voted yes on ballot measures that raise their state’s minimum wage. In April, Baker said he was “comfortable’’ with Massachusetts legislation that would raise minimum wage from $8 to $10.50 an hour by 2016.

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According to The Washington Post, the minimum wage increase will be rolled-out incrementally over time, starting in 2015.

Editor’s Note: A previous version of this story incorrectly stated workers would be eligible for an hour of paid time-off every 30 days worked. Workers will be eligible for an hour of paid time-off for every 30 hours worked.

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