Why you might want to look for a ‘work spouse’

Top Places to Work 2015

Theresa Masnik and Jennifer Toole consider themselves work spouses at SHIFT Communications in Newton, MA.
Theresa Masnik and Jennifer Toole consider themselves work spouses at SHIFT Communications in Newton, MA. –Keith Bedford/The Boston Globe
Theresa Masnik and Jennifer Toole consider themselves work spouses at SHIFT Communications in Newton, MA. —Keith Bedford/The Boston Globe

Do you have someone at work you would consider a best friend? Or even more, a work “wife’’ or “husband’’?

If so, you probably find your job more enjoyable, and maybe even perform better.

The Boston Globe reports that Gallup research found “employees with a best friend at work are seven times more likely to be engaged in their jobs.’’

[The companies featured in this story are among the winners of The Boston Globe’s 2015 Top Places to Work awards. You can see a full list of winners and read more coverage here.]

In fact, sometimes having a “work spouse’’ can give you things your actual significant other cannot.

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The Globe writes:

“With a work spouse, it’s easier to set your feelings aside than at home, and work wives and husbands—intimately familiar with the pressures their office partners face—are less likely to tune out during work talk. As for the gender of either spouse, that doesn’t necessarily matter; it’s the support that counts.’’

And this is a pretty common trend.

A 2010 survey found that 60 percent of workers in North America have a work spouse at some point in their career.

See some work spouse examples and read the full Globe story here.

You can see a full list of Top Places to Work winners and read more coverage here.

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