Scott Brown to Collect Massachusetts Pension

Brown will collect a state penion roughly around $60,000 annually after nearly 17 years of state, county and municipal service.
Brown will collect a state penion roughly around $60,000 annually after nearly 17 years of state, county and municipal service. –David L. Ryan/The Boston Globe

After a political career that included 12 years on Beacon Hill, nearly three years in the U.S. Capitol and six months campaigning across New Hampshire, Scott Brown is — technically — retiring.

According to the Boston Globe, the former United States senator has applied for his Massachusetts state pension based on nearly 17 years of state, county and municipal service. Brown filed his application to the State Board of Retirement on November 17, less than two weeks after he lost his bid against Senator Jeanne Shaheen for the Granite State’s Senate seat.

Based on a maximum of 80 percent of applicants’ highest three earning years, Brown is estimated to draw around $60,000 annually. The 55-year-old can also collect retiree health benefits. His highest annual compensation was $76,440, during his final years as state senator, according to the documents submitted to the Board of Retirement.

Advertisement

After losing in New Hampshire, Brown returned to Fox News in November, where he also appeared as a contributor from February 2013 to March 2014, earning $136,538.

Though Brown has not ruled out anything, political analysts said the move to collect a Massachusetts state pension could complicate any future political career, especially in New Hampshire.

“You can’t fault anybody for getting their pension that they’ve earned,’’ Ron Here, a Republican public affairs strategist, told the Boston Globe. “But if you’re looking at running for another state office, it’s probably not the best timing or message you want to have delivered.’’

Elected in 1998, Brown served three terms as a state representative and then three terms as state senator. In 2010, he won a special election for Ted Kennedy’s former U.S. Senate seat. He was the first Republican Senator to be elected in Massachusetts since Edward Brooke in 1972.

After losing reelection to Warren, Brown switched his residency to his vacation home in Rye, New Hampshire in 2013 and announced his Senate run against Shaheen the following April.

State pension officials will review Brown’s application and calculate his monthly check totals by his first check, likely near the end of February.

Jump To Comments