Cambridge will no longer charge protests for police details

The ACLU argued the fees, which amounted to thousands of dollars, violated organizer's First Amendment rights.

A womens march and rally was held on the Cambridge Common on the one year anniversary of the giant women's march in Washington.
A "Women's March" was held on Cambridge Common on the one-year anniversary of President Donald Trump's inauguration. –John Tlumacki / The Boston Globe

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP) — A Massachusetts city says it will no longer charge organized protests, vigils and marches for the costs of providing police security and emergency medical services.

Cambridge and the American Civil Liberties Union announced a settlement Thursday in a lawsuit challenging the city’s decision to charge Massachusetts Peace Action for costs related to the Jan. 20 “Women’s March” on the one-year anniversary of President Donald Trump’s inauguration.

The march, among hundreds organized nationwide, drew roughly 10,000 people to Cambridge Common and prompted police from Cambridge and neighboring towns to respond.

The ACLU argued the fees, which amounted to thousands of dollars, violated organizer’s First Amendment rights.

Advertisement

The settlement waives the charges imposed on the nonprofit group and says the city won’t seek to bill other groups for “non-commercial” gatherings going forward.

Close

Get the latest breaking news sent directly to your phone. Download our free app.