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Boston City Hall joins global movement to ‘light the world in teal’ for Alzheimer’s Awareness Month

Alongside many international attractions, Boston lit up to show support for people who have been impacted by the disease.

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Boston City Hall is glowing in shades of teal Thursday night to raise awareness about Alzheimer’s disease and show support for people and families who have experienced its impact. 

Mayor Marty Walsh posted to Twitter Thursday night explaining the display, which is part of a global effort led by the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America.

“This devastating disease and other dementias touch 50 million people worldwide,” Walsh said. “Today and every day we think of you.”

November is Alzheimer’s Awareness Month, and the foundation is leading a 30-day Light the World in Teal campaign to spur more education and conversation around the disease. 

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City Hall joins sites from across the world that have turned on their teal lights to show support from The Bell Tower in Australia, to the Oamaru Opera House in New Zealand, to Seattle’s Columbia Center. 

The Back Bay’s Prudential Center was also lit up for the occasion. 

“Today, almost everyone knows someone who has been impacted by Alzheimer’s disease, but not everyone understands what it is or what they can do about it,” Charles Fuschillo Jr., the Alzheimer’s Foundation’s President and CEO, said in a statement. “Alzheimer’s Awareness Month is an empowering reminder to take better care of our own health, and brain, and to get memory screenings, just as regularly, and importantly, as we do blood pressure and cholesterol checkups.”

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Alzheimer’s currently affects more than 5.8 million Americans, according to the foundation, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that number will grow to 14 million by 2060.

“Alzheimer’s disease is not a normal part of aging, early detection matters (get memory screenings), and lifestyle choices can reduce risk,” the non-profit stated in a release. Officials urged anyone who experiences the disease’s symptoms to seek a memory screening as an important first step toward detecting memory issues early on. 

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