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These 18 bodies of water in Massachusetts now have algae bloom advisories

The number of blooms reported has doubled in the past month.

In 2020, Shubael Pond closed to swimmers and pets as the result of a toxic algae bloom. John Tlumacki / The Boston Globe, File

There are now 18 bodies of water in Massachusetts with harmful bacteria advisories. The number of cyanobacterial blooms reported to the state Department of Public Health has doubled in the past month, with only nine listed in an advisory from July.

The bodies of water include Jamaica Pond in Boston and Lake Cochituate, which has been closed for around a month. The locations remain closed off until they are determined safe by the Department of Public Health.

Toxic algae blooms are a common occurrence in bodies of water in Massachusetts in the summer and early fall. Cyanobacteria usually appear on bodies of freshwater as blue or green, either on the surface or along the shoreline of the water. 

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If exposed, through skin contact or ingestion of the water, it can be harmful for humans and animals. The Department of Public Health urges individuals to stay out of the water if they suspect an algae bloom. 

Individuals should also contact their local health department if they suspect an algae bloom, and the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection if it is at a drinking water reservoir. 

Read the full list:

  • Hopkinton Reservoir (Upper beach area), Ashland
  • Long Pond Marstons Mills, Barnstable
  • Muddy/Crocker Pond, Barnstable
  • Jamaica Pond, Boston
  • Queen Sewell Pond, Bourne
  • Schoolhouse Pond, Brewster
  • White Pond, Concord
  • South Watuppa Pond, Fall River/Westport
  • Lake Cochituate (all ponds), Framingham, Natick, & Wayland
  • Waushakum Pond, Framingham
  • Indian Head Pond, Hanson
  • Santuit Pond, Mashpee
  • Cutler Park, Needham
  • Sassaquin Pond, New Bedford
  • Triangle Pond, Northampton
  • Big West Pond, Plymouth
  • Peter’s Pond, Sandwich
  • Lake Pearl, Wrentham
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