Local

More house fires occur on Thanksgiving than any other day. Here’s how to cook a safe meal.

Pro tip: Think twice about deep frying that turkey.

For those who plan to deep fry a turkey this Thanksgiving, the National Fire Protection Association advises doing it on a flat surface outdoors and at least 10 feet away from structures, including porches. Turkeys should be completely thawed and dried before being placed in the deep fryer to avoid flare-ups. Screenshot/National Fire Protection Association

Several area fire departments issued warnings ahead of Thanksgiving, reminding residents that the holiday is the most common day for home cooking fires, according to the National Fire Protection Association.

In 2019, firefighters across the country responded to about 1,400 fires on Thanksgiving, according to the association.

Other high-volume days for cooking fires are, in order, Christmas Day, the day before Thanksgiving, Easter, and Christmas Eve.

Here are a few fire safety tips from the association to ensure your enjoyment of the holiday:

  • Never leave anything cooking unattended.
  • The NFPA discourages deep frying turkeys. Those who do should do so on a flat surface outdoors and at least 10 feet away from structures, including porches. Turkeys should be completely thawed and dried before being placed in the deep fryer to avoid flare-ups.
  • Stand by your pan. If a grease fire starts in a pan, smother the flames by sliding the lid — while wearing an oven mitt — over the pan. If safe to do so, turn off the heat source. Do not move the pan, and keep the lid on until the fire is out and the pan is completely cool.
  • Stay home when cooking your turkey, and check on it frequently.
  • Make sure children and pets stay away from the stove. Kids and pets should be kept 3 feet away from the stove.
  • Keep kids away from hot food and liquids. The steam or splash from vegetables, gravy, or coffee can cause serious burns.
  • Keep knives out of the reach of children.
  • Make sure electric cords are not dangling off the counter within easy reach of a child.
  • Keep matches and utility lighters out of the reach of children — up high in a locked cabinet.
  • Keep the kitchen and dining room floor clear so you don’t trip over kids, toys, purses or bags while cooking or handling food.
  • Test your smoke alarms and make sure their batteries are replaced if needed.
Jump To Comments

Conversation

This discussion has ended. Please join elsewhere on Boston.com