Local

If you’re looking to adopt a pet, you might want these 2 — or these 200

There is no shortage of available animals in the Greater Boston area.

Frieda, left, and Franklin are a bonded pair up for adoption through the ARL. American Rescue League of Boston

A special pair of seniors dogs at the Animal Rescue League of Boston is seeking a home to spend their retirement years.

Franklin, a 9-year-old Sharpei, and Frieda, a 6-year-old Sharpei, initially arrived at the ARL in late 2018 as part of a transport of dogs from North Carolina. Due to their sweet demeanor, they were able to find a new home quickly, the shelter said.

Sadly, their owner recently died, and so the pair is once again seeking a forever home.

The bonded pair, described as fun-loving and extremely friendly, needs to be together. Shelter staff said they understand that it will require a special home to take in not just one, but two, senior dogs.

Advertisement:

Though the pair is healthy overall, they will have medical needs that require attention — Franklin is prone to ear infections, while Frieda’s allergies can cause dry skin and/or ear infections.

In a statement, the ARL pointed out that senior animals can be overlooked by potential adopters in search of puppies, kitten, or young adult animals. With that in mind, the shelter stressed that senior animals like Franklin and Frieda do not require the attention, training, and patience that are often needed with younger animals.

Interested adopters can learn more about Franklin and Frieda at arlboston.org.

Meanwhile, more than 200 adoptable animals, including a llama named Hyacinth, have arrived at the MSPCA at Nevins Farm in recent weeks.

Some of the animals were voluntary surrenders, while others stemmed from law enforcement investigations into allegations of neglect, according to a report by NBC10 Boston.

To check out all of the animals available for adoption — dogs, cats, birds, hamsters, horses, pigs, goats and more — go to mspca.org.

Conversation

This discussion has ended. Please join elsewhere on Boston.com