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Elizabeth Warren’s Native American problem goes beyond politics

Senator Elizabeth Warren says now, as she has from the first days of her public life, that she based her assertions about her heritage on her reasonable trust in what she was told about her ancestry as a child. –Sasha Arutyunova/The New York Times/file 2017

WASHINGTON — There’s a ghost haunting Elizabeth Warren as she ramps up for a possible 2020 presidential bid and a reelection campaign in Massachusetts this year:
her enduring and undocumented claims of Native American ancestry.

Warren says now, as she has from the first days of her public life, that she based her assertions on family lore, on her reasonable trust in what she was told about her ancestry as a child.

“I know who I am,’’ she said in a recent interview with the Globe.

Some tribe members want Warren to apologize to Native Americans for claiming heritage without solid evidence. —MICHAEL REYNOLDS/EPA/Shutterstock
Questions about Warren’s complicated relationships with Native American tribes gained steam recently. —Manuel Balce Ceneta/Associated Press/File 2017
The Globe spoke with Ina Mapes, Warren’s second cousin, in 2012. —Joshua Lott for The Boston Globe/File
When Warren was running for the Senate in 2012, then-Senator Scott Brown focused on her heritage. —Globe Staff/File 2012
It’s President Trump who may be doing the most to push Native Americans into Warren’s camp. —Oliver Contreras/Getty Images/file 2017