Politics

Photos: Boston-area mourners gather to memorialize Ruth Bader Ginsburg

"She was an incredible icon, and she fought so hard for us."

Messages are placed at a memorial honoring Ruth Bader Ginsburg outside the Harvard Law School Library in Cambridge Saturday. Craig F. Walker/Globe Staff

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Even as the battle to replace her on the nation’s highest court heated up in Washington, mourners around the U.S. gathered to pay their respects to Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died Friday at her home in Washington at age 87.

The Boston area was no exception, with vigils and makeshift memorials popping up in Copley Square, at the West Roxbury division of the Boston Municipal Court, and outside the Harvard Law School Library in Cambridge, among others. Ginsburg was also honored with a moment of silence before the game between the Boston Red Sox and the New York Yankees at Fenway Park Saturday.

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These images capture scenes of the local vigils over the weekend:

Catherine Walker-Jacks secures a message to the memorial she created honoring Ruth Bader Ginsburg outside the Harvard Law School Library at Langdell Hall in Cambridge on Saturday. She said she hoped the message board would offer a place for people to show their appreciation for Ginsburg. “It’s a place to express personal grief but also see the community come together,” she said.

First-year law students Annie Whitney, left, and Catherine Walker-Jacks admire the memorial honoring Ruth Bader Ginsburg outside the Harvard Law School Library.

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Thea Bissell, of Somerville, carries her son Eberlan while visiting a memorial honoring Ruth Bader Ginsburg outside the Harvard Law School Library. Bissell said of Ginsburg, “She was an incredible icon, and she fought so hard for us.”

Messages are placed at a memorial honoring Ruth Bader Ginsburg outside the Harvard Law School Library.

Andrew Rossi-Schroeder reads messages left at a memorial honoring Ruth Bader Ginsburg outside the Harvard Law School Library Saturday. Rossi-Schroeder, a first-year law student, said of Ginsburg’s death, “It’s devastating. She’s a huge moral figure. She put humanity and dignity always alongside the codes and rules of law.”

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Marjorie Budzynski, of Boston, wipes away a tear at a Copley Square vigil for Ruth Bader Ginsburg. “When I heard about her death, I was really scared for women in America,” she said.

Courtney Loring, left, of Boston, and Abbigail Shirk, of Brookline, light candles at a vigil for Ruth Bader Ginsburg in Copley Square.

Annie Offen, of Brookline, holds a flower while listening to a speaker at a vigil for Ruth Bader Ginsburg in Copley Square. At the end of the vigil, she privately drank grape juice with a friend and read a prayer for Ginsburg. “She liked wine, but we don’t drink,” one of them said.

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Sister Lida Christ of The Boston Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence reads from the vigil program in Copley Square.

Boston City Councilor Michelle Wu, at left, joins mourners remembering the Ruth Bader Ginsburg outside the West Roxbury division of the Boston Municipal Court on Saturday night.

Laura Barr, of Jamaica Plain, holds up a sign remembering Ruth Bader Ginsburg outside the West Roxbury division of the Boston Municipal Court.

Grieving community members paid tribute to Ruth Bader Ginsburg outside the West Roxbury division of the Boston Municipal Court on Saturday night.

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Victor Pavlenkov, of Cambridge, joined a weekly standout of about a dozen Black Lives Matter protesters on Mass. Ave. in Porter Square to honor the life of Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Pavlenkov, who is a Libertarian, said he believes strongly in dissent and the need for discourse and felt compelled to come out and honor someone who contributed so much to society.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg is honored with a moment of silence before the game between the Boston Red Sox and the New York Yankees at Fenway Park Saturday.

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