Politics

Ed Markey reveals his unusual go-to Dunkin’ order

"My mother's not happy."

Sen. Ed Markey addresses supporters last November during a campaign stop in Boston. Steven Senne / AP

Like any good Massachusetts native, Sen. Ed Markey is a Dunkin’ regular.

However, unlike his partner in the Senate, we wouldn’t describe his go-to order as a classic.

During a 30-minute interview Tuesday with Crooked Media focusing on the perhaps more important subjects of the COVID-19 pandemic, climate change, Republican attempts to challenge the presidential election results, and the Senate runoffs in Georgia, the Malden Democrat somewhat reluctantly confessed his preferred Dunkin’ order in response to a listener question.

According to Markey, it begins on a not-so-unusual note: A large, dark coffee with “extra cream and sugar.”

Relatively normal stuff.

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But then in took a surprising — and, a lot of people are saying, alarming — turn.

“I order a jelly doughnut, which I love, a lemon doughnut, and a coconut doughnut — three,” Markey said. “I don’t eat all of them. You know, my mother’s not happy, like, ‘Clean your plate.’ But a little bit of a taste of each one is good, and I also usually get a bottle of orange juice, as well as a bottle of water.”

The Green New Deal resolution co-author noted that he ends up walking back to the Ford Escape — a hybrid, of course — “kinda loaded down,” but stressed that the “intent” is not to eat “the entirety of those doughnuts.”

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Rather, he said, it is to “not pass a day without having a taste of each one.”

Pressed on the topic, a Markey aide confirmed that the Dunkin’ stops — including the doughnut-sampling routine — were a usual occurrence during the senator’s re-election campaign this past year (or, if not Dunkin’, Dempsey’s in Medford).

“The three doughnuts were an every morning thing,” Taylor St. Germain, Markey’s deputy communications director, told Boston.com.

During the interview, Markey suggested that his wife, Susan Blumenthal, a public health advocate and former U.S. assistant surgeon general, wasn’t exactly on board with his routine.

“She’s judging me,” he said.

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