Politics

Bridget Nee-Walsh

"I am running for City Council to fight for working families like mine."

Bridget Nee-Walsh

Bridget Nee-Walsh, 42, is a South Boston local and currently a member of the Ironworkers Local 7. Nee-Walsh is also a business owner with two stores, Southie’s Own and Babe Mannion’s Irish Shoppe, and a single mother to 5-year-old Celia.

Born and raised in Boston, Nee-Walsh received an education at Archbishop Williams High School in Braintree before attending Burren College of Art in County Clare, Ireland and Montserrat College of Art in Beverly. 

Why are you running for at-large city councilor?

As a 15-year member of Ironworkers Local 7, I am running for City Council to be a voice and a champion for working families in City Hall. We need a government that will stand up for working people and build a more livable city for working families like mine. I believe the City of Boston needs to invest in affordable housing, public education, and public safety to ensure a livable, affordable Boston for all of its residents.

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There are 17 candidates for at-large city councilor. What accomplishments and proposals do you think make you stand out from the others? Please be specific.

Anybody who has seen me at one of my events will tell you that I’m not a polished politician, I’m everybody else in the room. I got into this race because of my background as a single mother, a small business owner, and a Union Ironworker, and it is that background that differentiates me from the other people running. As a single mother to a 5-year-old daughter, I believe that we must strengthen our public schools and ensure that every child receives a world-class education, regardless of race, ethnicity, or zip code. As a Union Ironworker, I know that we need a government that stands up for working families like mine. Lastly, as someone who grew up in South Boston and opened a business on West Broadway, I believe that we need to make investments in affordable housing and public safety so that the working families who built this city can afford to stay here and thrive here.

What would be your top three objectives during your term as city councilor?

I am running for City Council to fight for working families like mine. My first objective would be to increase the construction of affordable housing and expand rent-to-own programs so that the working families who built this city can continue to live here. As a single mother to a 5-year-old daughter, I will fight tirelessly to improve our Boston Public Schools and ensure that every child receives a quality education. We can’t keep pointing to our exam schools as success stories while turning a blind eye to the countless students that are stuck in underperforming institutions, and we must expand vocational programs in order to ensure that kids who aren’t going to college have a reliable pathway to the middle class. Lastly, we need to make Boston more livable by making key investments in things like public safety, senior care, and public transportation.

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What is one thing you want the City of Boston to know about you?

Everywhere I go on the campaign trail, I like to share my story about where I come from and the life experiences that shaped me because that story and those experiences are why I chose to get in this race. I was born and raised in Boston, and I am a 15-year member of Ironworkers Local 7, the owner of two small businesses, and a single mother of a 5-year-old daughter, Celia. I got into this race to be a champion for working families like mine, and to fight for good-paying jobs, improved public schools, and a more affordable, livable city. With Mayor (Marty) Walsh now serving as the Secretary of Labor, workers like me have lost a true champion in City Hall, and I am running to help fill the gigantic shoes he left behind and be a tireless advocate for working people.

What is your typical Dunkin’ order?

Medium Iced Caramel Macchiato with skim milk and one sugar. The guys at the Local 7 hall love to tease me about it, but I don’t care, it tastes good.

Visit Bridget Nee-Walsh at her website, Facebook or Twitter.

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Previous candidate: Carla Monteiro

Next candidate: Said A. Abdikarim

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