TV

Tony Sirico, who played Paulie Walnuts on ‘The Sopranos,’ dies at 79

Sirico played the violent and loyal right-hand man to mobster Tony Soprano, shaking down rivals and doing his boss's dirty work when asked.

Tony Sirico, James Gandolfini WILL HART


Actor Tony Sirico, known for his role as Paulie Walnuts in the popular American television show “The Sopranos,” died Friday at 79, his family and manager announced.

Bob McGowan, Sirico’s manager of 25 years, said that Sirico died Friday morning at an assisted-living facility in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. McGowan said he did not know the cause of death.

“He was a really good guy,” McGowan said, adding that Sirico “always gave to charities” and visited hospitals to comfort children.

In a Facebook post, the actor’s brother, Robert Sirico, said: “The family is deeply grateful for the many expressions of love, prayer and condolences and requests that the public respect its privacy in this time of bereavement.”

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Sirico’s co-star Michael Imperioli, who played Christopher Moltisanti on “The Sopranos,” posted a photo of the duo on Instagram on Friday evening, writing that he was “heartbroken today.”

“We found a groove as Christopher and Paulie and I am proud to say I did a lot of my best and most fun work with my dear pal Tony,” Imperioli’s post said. “I will miss him forever.”

On “The Sopranos” — which Rolling Stone rated as the greatest TV show of all time in 2016 — Sirico played the violent and loyal right-hand man to mobster Tony Soprano, shaking down rivals and doing his boss’s dirty work when asked.

Sirico was a natural fit for the part, having grown up in the Italian mob world himself. He was arrested 28 times beginning at age 7, he told the Los Angeles Times in 1990.

“After all the times I was pinched, I knew every judge in town,” he told the publication. “In our neighborhood, if you weren’t carrying a gun, it was like you were the rabbit during rabbit-hunting season.”

During his last prison stay in the early 1970s, the Times reported, he saw a performance by a group of ex-con actors that inspired him.

“He was that person,” McGowan said of Sirico’s character on the show. “He grew up with that world.”

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