Fall House Hunt

5 things to know about living in the Seaport District

It’s expensive, it’s historic, and there is no lack of good food.

It’s expensive, it’s historic, and there is no lack of good food. Wendy Maeda / Globe Staff

Boston’s Seaport District has had quite a year (and has come a long way since tea was dumped nearby in the harbor).

It is one of Boston’s hottest neighborhoods in terms of development, while at the same time The Boston Globe recently questioned if it could ever have the soul of one of Boston’s other neighborhoods.

It is a part of the South Boston neighborhood and includes Fort Point, a local historic district, that is known for industrial buildings that have been turned into chic apartments and restaurants.

Though it is Boston’s newest residential neighborhood (and does not yet have a grocery store), there is plenty to do, see, eat, and drink.

Advertisement:

1. You’ll live in…

Rendering of 319A luxury condo building – ADD Inc, now with Stantec

… an industrial loft or a luxury building. In the Fort Point section, you can expect to live in a building that had a former purpose. Take the 319 A Street condos – the large five-story brick building is 100 years old and was once owned by the Boston Wharf Co. There is plenty of exposed brick and historic charm, yet does not lack any desired modern amenities.

But, as easily noticed from the number of cranes in the skyline, the Seaport is also building new towers – most of which are luxury residences. Wherever you live in the Seaport, you can expect to live in style.

2. You’ll pay…

View from an apartment at 100 Pier 4, yet another new apartment building with rents all starting close to $3,000. – David L Ryan / Globe Staff

… for mostly luxury living. It is hard to find an exact median home price for the neighborhood, as the Seaport is included in South Boston’s home values, but you can quickly get a sense of what the neighborhood costs by looking building by building.

One-bedroom apartments in the 315 on A apartments start at over $3,000 per month, while two-bedrooms get close to $5,000. The Waterside Place apartments start at around $2,500 for an apartment with one bedroom and start at $5,356 for a place with three bedrooms. If you are looking to buy, 319 A Street condos range from $450,000 for a studio to $1.3 million for a two-bedroom.

Advertisement:

3. You’ll hang out…

A look inside Row 34. – Jonathan Wiggs / The Boston Globe

… doing a lot of eating and drinking. The Globe recently noted that the Seaport neighborhood has over four restaurant seats for every home in the area, so there is always a great place to eat close by.

Row 34 is the highest rated Seaport restaurant on Yelp. It is known for its fresh seafood, oysters, and excellent beer selection, along with an ambiance only an old industrial building could provide.

There are also plenty of other seafood options, and some bakeries (Flour), and coffee shops (Barrington).

Inside look at Harpoon Brewery. – John Tlumacki / The Boston Globe

There are two breweries in the neighborhood as well: Harpoon, where you can hang out, take a tour, and drink, along with Trillium, where you can go to buy a growler to go.

If you are full, you can walk around to a variety of art galleries (especially during an open studio day), go to the Boston Fire Museum, the Boston Tea Party Museum, go to a concert at the Blue Hills Bank Pavilion, or just enjoy the amazing waterfront views.

4. Your kids will…

A view of the museum from Congress Street. – Yoon S. Byun / Globe Staff

… not go to school here. The Boston Globe noted that the neighborhood does not yet have its own school, though a developer is looking to potentially build a charter school. There are not many kids in the neighborhood just yet. The Boston Redevelopment Authority wrote in its end of the year report that kids made up less than 5 percent of the population in the South Boston Waterfront.

Advertisement:

Though if you do have children in the neighborhood, the Boston Children’s Museum is right on Congress Street and has a variety of innovative exhibitions and activities for young kids (and even adults sometimes too).

5. You’ll love…

The Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) in the Seaport District on the South Boston waterfront. – Robert S. Davis / Globe Staff

… the Institute of Contemporary Art. The ICA is right on the water and is never short of interesting exhibits. In the summer, it hosts concerts out on the outdoor patio overlooking the water. Even in the colder months, the museum frequently has student nights, family nights, performances, films, and more.

Related: This is what the Seaport used to look like

Photo history of the South Boston waterfront

A view across the Boston Wharf Co. toward the Boston skyline ca. 1898-1907. Boston Wharf Co., the major developer in the area, was established in the 1830s and lasted until the early 2000s. Boston Public Library via Digital Commonwealth

1 of 20

This ca. 1898-1907 view shows the Fort Point area industries, Boston Button Co. and Boston Asphalt. Boston Public Library via Digital Commonwealth

2 of 20

A look down A Street, where the business Western Union and Willian Prary resided, ca. 1898u20131907. Boston Public Library via Digital Commonwealth

3 of 20

Horses wait outside The Sherwin Williams Co., ca. 1900-1907. The paint manufacturer was one of the many companies who had factories in Fort Point. Boston Public Library via Digital Commonwealth

4 of 20

A ca. 1898u20131907 view of the American Radiator Co., one of the many businesses located in Fort Point. Boston Public Library via Digital Commonwealth

5 of 20

Two men stand inside of a storage shed, ca. 1898u20131907. Boston Public Library via Digital Commonwealth

6 of 20

A look down A Street from Congress Street showing the Summer Street bridge. Floydu2019s Quicker Lunch is to the left, ca. 1898u20131907. Boston Public Library via Digital Commonwealth

7 of 20

A view down Congress Street toward the east from the corner of A Street. Bernstein Electric Co. is to the left, ca. 1898u20131907. Boston Public Library via Digital Commonwealth

8 of 20

A group of men, ca. 1898u20131907, sit on a rooftop with the wharves, a grain elevator, ship, and freight car in the background. Boston Public Library via Digital Commonwealth

9 of 20

A view of Boston from Fort Point across the Northern Avenue bridge, ca. 1919. Boston Public Library via Digital Commonwealth

10 of 20

John Sullivan (right) stands on his unique houseboat, Dawn, in 1928. He lived year round in the South Boston Boatyard. Flickr Creative Commons/ Boston Public Library

11 of 20

A 1929 view of South Boston and the Fort Point Channel from the Fire Department in the South End. Flickr Creative Commons/ Boston Public Library

12 of 20

The Congress Street Bridge connects Fort Point with the rest of the city, ca. 1929. Boston Public Library

13 of 20

A view of South Boston and Fort Point from the South End Fire Department, ca. 1929. Boston Public Library via Digital Commonwealth

14 of 20

An overhead view of a bustling fish pier in South Boston, ca. 1929. Boston Public Library

15 of 20

A horse pulling a cart stand outside on the South Boston waterfront with a view of the city in the background, ca. 1930. Boston Public Library via Digital Commonwealth

16 of 20

An aerial view of Boston and the Fort Point Channel around 1932. Boston Public Library via Digital Commonwealth

17 of 20

A schooner is docked in the Fort Point Channel during winter when the water is icy, ca. 1939. Boston Public Library via Digital Commonwealth

18 of 20

A Public Works boat tows garbage from Fort Point Channel in 1956. Boston Public Library

19 of 20

People watch a Boston Tea Party reenactment on the HMS Beaver in the Fort Point Channel in 1973. Boston Public Library via Digital Commonwealth

20 of 20

Conversation

This discussion has ended. Please join elsewhere on Boston.com