Bruins

Why play wasn’t stopped for Tuukka Rask’s skate

Here's the official NHL rule.

Boston Bruins goaltender Tuukka Rask (40) tries to show the officials his broken skate blade after a goal by Tampa Bay Lightning defenseman Mikhail Sergachev during the second period of Game 1 of an NHL second-round hockey playoff series Saturday, April 28, 2018, in Tampa, Fla. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)
Boston Bruins goaltender Tuukka Rask tries to show the officials his broken skate blade after a goal by Tampa Bay Lightning defenseman Mikhail Sergachev. AP Photo/Chris O'Meara

In the second period of the Bruins’ Game 1 Stanley Cup Playoff clash with the Lightning, Mikhail Sergachev scored a power-play goal for the Lightning to cut Boston’s lead to 3-2.

Bruins goaltender Tuukka Rask took immediate issue with the goal, because the blade on his skate had been knocked off in the moments leading up to score. Rask was visibly upset in the aftermath, but there’s a specific NHL rule regarding clothing and equipment which appears to explain why play wasn’t stopped.

First, here’s the play itself, including Rask’s blade being knocked off his skate:

As for NHL rule 14, titled “Adjustment to Clothing or Equipment,” here it is:

Adjustment to Clothing or Equipment – Play shall not be stopped nor the game delayed by reasons of adjustments to clothing, equipment, skates or sticks.

The onus of maintaining clothing and equipment in proper condition shall be upon the player. If adjustments are required, the player shall leave the ice and play shall continue with a substitute.

No delay shall be permitted for the repair or adjustment of goalkeeper’s equipment. If adjustments are required, the goalkeeper shall leave the ice and his place shall be taken by the substitute goalkeeper immediately.

Update: After the Bruins won Game 1 by a 6-2 margin, Rask had this to say:

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However, a league spokesperson seemed to indicate differently:

https://twitter.com/drosennhl/status/990357459440144384