Here’s how much money the Boston Marathon winners make

In 2016, John Hancock will award a total of $830,500 to the top marathon runners.

Men's wheelchair winner Marcel Hug crosses the Boston Marathon finish line.
Men's wheelchair winner Marcel Hug crosses the Boston Marathon finish line. –Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff

Boston Marathon runners are known for raising millions for charity and nonprofit organizations, but fewer talk about the money the winners take home.

Since 1986, John Hancock Financial Services has awarded prize money to those who place in select divisions. In 2016, John Hancock will dole out a total of $830,500 to the top runners in the overall race, the master’s division, and the push-rim wheelchair division.

The first 15 men and 15 women from the overall race who cross the finish line are awarded prize money, with the first-place finishers each taking home $150,000. The breakdown for the next 14 winners is as follows:

  • Second place: $75,000
  • Third place: $40,000
  • Fourth place: $25,000
  • Fifth place: $15,000
  • Sixth place: $12,000
  • Seventh place: $9,000
  • Eighth place: $7,400
  • Ninth place: $5,700
  • 10th place: $4,200
  • 11th place: $2,600
  • 12th place: $2,100
  • 13th place: $1,800
  • 14th place: $1,700
  • 15th place: $1,500

The first five men and women in the master’s division will also receive prize money, with the first place man and woman each taking home $10,000, and the other top four runners receiving between $1,000-$5,000 in a tiered system.

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For the fastest 10 men and women in the push-rim wheelchair division, John Hancock will award the following prize money:

  • First place: $20,000
  • Second place: $10,000
  • Third place: $5,000
  • Fourth place: $2,500
  • Fifth place: $1,250
  • Sixth place: $900
  • Seventh place: $800
  • Eighth place: $700
  • Ninth place: $600
  • 10th place: $500

If any of the men and women in the overall race break either the world record or top the course record, they’re eligible for a $50,000 or $25,000 bonus, respectively. In the master’s and wheelchair divisions, competitors will receive an extra $10,000 for setting a new world record, or an additional $7,500 for breaking the course record.

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