Live: The latest news from the 2017 Boston Marathon

We'll be updating this page with everything you need to know and see throughout the day.

Lonnie Coone proposed to his girlfriend Carmen Ortiz upon approaching the Boston Marathon finish line Monday. —Photo courtesy of Carmen Ortiz

Lonnie Coone had finished much longer races than the Boston Marathon. But never with an ending like this.

For most, finishing the Boston Marathon in 3 hours and 8 minutes would be enough of a reason for celebration. But Lonnie Coone has another.

Upon nearing the finish line at a near-7-minute-mile pace, Coone capped off Monday’s race by proposing to his girlfriend, Carmen Ortiz. Spoiler alert: Ortiz said yes. Read more.

—Nik DeCosta-Klipa

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A jubilant runner crosses the finish line almost four and a half hours into the marathon. —John Tlumacki/Globe staff

These Boston Marathon finish line photos are glorious and emotional

It’s been a few hours since the first competitors crossed the finish line of the 121st Boston Marathon, and since then, thousands of runners have found triumphant finishes to their 26.2-mile journey to Boylston Street.

From elation to agony, a range of emotions are on display as the runners cross the line. One thing they have in common? All are now 2017 Boston Marathon finishers. Read more.

—Marisa Dellatto

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Natick High School and Boston College alumni Kevin Krueger and Doug Flutie ran the 2017 Boston Marathon. —Twitter

Doug Flutie finished his third Boston Marathon in under 5 hours

Boston College football great Doug Flutie finished his third Boston Marathon on Monday in a time of 4:50:41, shaving off almost 15 minutes from his 2015 time and nearly an hour from his 2014 mark. Read more.

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—Nicole Yang

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Popsicles at mile 22. —Twitter/Audrey Scagnelli‏

Good samaritans save the day with popsicles at mile 22

The heat presented a challenge for many runners during Monday’s Boston Marathon.

With temperatures reaching the mid-70s, generous spectators provided neon-colored popsicles—and some major relief—to marathoners at mile 22. Read more.

—Karli Bendlin

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Runners begin their climb up Heartbreak Hill. —Craig F. Walker / The Boston Globe

This marathoner tackled Heartbreak Hill with a beer in hand

Despite its many challenging miles, the Boston Marathon’s most infamously difficult section is Newton’s Heartbreak Hill.

And one runner —  Arizona resident Daradee Murray, according to her bib number — took a unique approach to conquering the formidable mile-20 stretch. Read more.

—Nik DeCosta-Klipa

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A sign on the Boston Marathon route. —Instagram/@raniamatar

This Boston Marathon sign brilliantly trolls United Airlines

There were some pretty great signs at the 2017 Boston Marathon, from Super Bowl 51 jokes to creative kiss requests from spectators along the Wellesley College Scream Tunnel.

But perhaps the most topical sign of the day came around the 23-mile mark, with this brutal roasting of United Airlines and their recent PR troubles after a passenger was dragged off of a flight. Read more.

—Kevin Slane

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Kathrine Switzer is welcomed across the finish line by BAA President Joann Flamino and given a medal. —John Tlumacki / The Boston Globe

Watch Kathrine Switzer cross the Boston Marathon finish line 50 years after making history

Kathrine Switzer once again crossed the finish line of the Boston Marathon wearing bib No. 261, 50 years after she became the first woman with an official number to run the race. Read more.

—Dialynn Dwyer

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A proud Patriots fan held up the Super Bowl scoreboard sign at the 2017 Boston Marathon. —Twitter

Read the most Boston sign from the Boston Marathon

It’s been almost three months since Super Bowl LI, but Patriots fans won’t be letting the Atlanta Falcons forget about their 28-3 blown lead any time soon.

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First came the butt tattoo of the scoreboard… Read more.

—Nicole Yang

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The heat is up and the water stations are busy. —Suzanne Kreiter / Boston Globe

Boston Marathon runners wilted under a hot sun this year

While Boston Marathon spectators were likely basking in the 70-plus degree weather on race day, the unusual warmth made it that much more difficult for runners to cross the finish line.

As temperatures reached the mid-70s on Monday, marathoners were struggling to power through the heat, with many needing wheelchairs and medical assistance, according to WBZ. Read more.

—Julia Giulardi

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Bobby Carpenter pushes Denna Laing at the start of the 2017 Boston Marathon. —Mary Schwalm / AP

Bobby Carpenter and Denna Laing, 2 former hockey stars, combined for an inspired Boston Marathon finish

Following a 2016 spinal cord injury that left her paralyzed, former Boston Pride hockey player Denna Laing likely never expected to be crossing the Boston Marathon finish line. Even before the injury, Laing says she was never “much of a runner.”

The 25-year-old Marblehead-native also likely never anticipated that she would team up with fellow Bay Stater and NHL Hall of Famer Bobby Carpenter. Read more.

—Nik DeCosta-Klipa

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Jake Mogan, of San Francisco, is carried to the finish line by Franklin Tenorio, of Equador, left, and Bryan Stansberry, of Columbus, Ohio, and members of the military. —AP Photo/Charles Krupa

Gov. Charlie Baker captured the spirit of the marathon with this finish line video

The 2017 Boston Marathon was full of sights and sounds that proved why the capital of Massachusetts is such a special city.

Governor Charlie Baker shared a touching finish line moment, via video on Twitter, that exhibits the camaraderie and compassion that define the race.

Runners Bryan Stanberry and Franklin Tenorio, along with two serviceman, not only carried fellow runner Jake Mogan to the finish line but also ran the final distance together as a group. Read more.

—Nicole Yang

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Boston Police Commissioner William Evans is congratulated after finishing. —Charles Krupa/AP

Boston police commissioner completes his first Boston Marathon since the 2013 bombing

Boston Police Commissioner William Evans made his return to the Boston Marathon as a runner on Monday, crossing the finish line for the first time since the 2013 bombing. Read more.

—Dialynn Dwyer

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Meb Keflezighi greets the family of 2013 Boston Marathon bombing victim Martin Richard. —AP Photo/Charles Krupa

Meb Keflezighi stopped to embrace Martin Richard’s family after final Boston Marathon

Moments after waving a final farewell at the finish line of his last Boston Marathon, Meb Keflezighi singled out a particular family in the crowd. In the immediate aftermath, the 2014 champion found the family of Martin Richard, the 8-year-old boy killed in the 2013 bombing. Read more.

—Hayden Bird

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A wheelchair disability runner makes the way along the course. —Keith Bedford/Globe Staff

Why the Boston Marathon is so inspiring, in one 60-second video

The 121st Boston Marathon is full of inspiring stories, but this 60-second video, shot around the 10-mile mark, really captures the feeling of the Boston Marathon in a few short scenes.

The video, shot in Natick Center, begins with a bearded man running while carrying an American flag. Read more.

—Kevin Slane

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Women’s winner, Edna Kiplagat, with her children, Wendy Jemutai ,9, and Carlos Kipkorir, 13. —John Tlumacki/The Boston G

Two of Edna Kiplagat’s kids stole the show at the Boston Marathon finish line

After breaking through the finish-line tape, the 2017 Boston Marathon elite women’s winner Edna Kiplagat kept going — directly into the embrace of two of her children. Read more.

—Nik DeCosta-Klipa

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Jose Sanchez runs along the course of the 121st Boston Marathon. —Steven Senne/AP

This Marine hoisting an American flag is inspiring everyone at the Boston Marathon

There’s no shortage of inspiring athletes participating in the 121st Boston Marathon on Monday.

But one runner in particular drew a large number of cheers on the course and posts to social media: a bearded runner holding an American flag. Read more.

—Kevin Slane

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Patrick Downes, left, 2013 Boston Marathon bombing survivor, finishes in the handcycle division. —AP Photo/Elise Amendola

Patrick Downes crosses marathon finish line on handcycle

Boston Marathon bombing survivor Patrick Downes crossed the finish line on a handcycle Monday to huge cheers from the crowds on Boylston Street.

This was the third year that Downes, who lost his leg in the 2013 attacks, competed in the race in the handcycle division, having also done so in 2014 and 2015. Last year, he ran the marathon using a prosthetic. Read more.

—Dialynn Dwyer

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Jordan Hasay, second from left, in the women’s lead pack. —Keith Bedford / The Boston Globe

American Jordan Hasay gets emotional remembering late mother after third-place Boston Marathon finish

American Jordan Hasay was thinking of her late mother after her third-place finish in the 2017 Boston Marathon.

“My mom passed away really unexpectedly in November, so that’s why it’s very emotional for me,” Hasay told CBS Boston’s Steve Burton after finishing her first marathon in a time of 2 hours, 23 minutes. “But I know that a lot of people out there lost loved ones here and so that really just lifted me up, and I was thinking about all of them and I know that they were with us all in spirit and that my mom would be really proud.” Read more.

—John Waller

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Bombing survivor Marc Fucarile talking to reporters after completing the Boston Marathon men’s handcycle race. —Steve Annear / Boston Globe

Marathon bombing survivor Marc Fucarile completes men’s handcycle race

Marc Fucarile just finished the men’s handcycle race at the Boston Marathon — and despite the bombings of four years ago, he told reporters the only thing on his mind was the support of the crowd.

Fucarile lost his leg in the 2013 Marathon bombings, and friends of his have organized fundraisers for him to cover medical expenses as he recovered from his injuries. Read more.

—John Hilliard, Globe Correspondent

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Women’s first place runner, Edna Kiplagat, and men’s first place runner, Geoffrey Kirui. —Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff

Kenyan runners have a banner day at 2017 Boston Marathon

Kenyan runners have a banner day at 2017 Boston MarathonPatriots Day? It was more like Kenyan Day at the Boston Marathon.

But it wasn’t a bad day to be an American, either.

Geoffrey Kirui and Edna Kiplagat — both making their Boston debuts — ran to victory in Monday’s 121st running of the race. Read more.

—Associated Press

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Geoffrey Kirui, of Kenya, crosses the finish line to win the 121st Boston Marathon. —Elise Amendola/AP

Geoffrey Kirui wins 2017 Boston Marathon men’s race

Kenya’s Geoffrey Kirui (JOFF’-ree key-ROO’-ee) has won the Boston Marathon — his first marathon victory ever.

Kirui outran Galen Rupp of the U.S. to take Monday’s 121st running of the race in an unofficial time of 2 hours, 9 minutes, 36 seconds. Read more.

—The Associated Press

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Women’s first place runner Edna Kiplagat crosses the finish line. —Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff

Edna Kiplagat wins Boston Marathon women’s race

Edna Kiplagat (KIP’-la-gat) has won her Boston Marathon debut.

The Kenyan policewoman opened up a big lead heading into the Newton hills, and she cruised to victory in an unofficial 2 hours, 21 minutes, 53 seconds in Monday’s 121st running of the race. Read more.

—Associated Press

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Shihan Wijeyeratne. —Screenshot/The Boston Globe

Meet the first runner to show up for the Boston Marathon

HOPKINTON – As the sun began to rise and illuminate a darkened sky, the Boston Marathon athletes village at Hopkinton High was eerily peaceful – a true calm before the storm, and arrival of thousands of runners.

Machinery transported food and water to the stations under the tent while volunteers traveled around in golf carts and security patrolled the area. And as the first bus pulled up to the entrance, 23-year old Shihan Wijeyeratne stepped down onto the ground and became the first runner to arrive for the 121st running of one of the world’s oldest and most famous footraces. Read more. 

—The Boston Globe

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Manuela Schar, of Switzerland, wins the women’s wheelchair division. —Elise Amendola/AP

Manuela Schar wins Boston Marathon women’s wheelchair race

The women have delivered another world best in the Boston Marathon wheelchair races.

Manuela Schar of Switzerland finished in an unofficial 1 hour, 28 minutes, 17 seconds to win the women’s wheelchair race on Monday.

It’s the first time ever that a woman has beaten the 1:30 mark. Read more. 

—Jimmy Golen, AP

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Marcel Hug, of Switzerland, wins the men’s wheelchair division ahead of Ernst Van Dyk, right, of South Africa. —AP Photo/Elise Amendola

What the dramatic Boston Marathon men’s wheelchair finish looked like on Bolyston Street

In yet another close finish, Marcel Hug edged his perpetual rival, Ernst van Dyk. It gave Hug his third straight wheelchair title in the Boston Marathon. Read more.

—Hayden Bird

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Wheelchair racer Marcel E. Hug crosses the finish line ahead of Ernst Van Dyk in the 121st Boston Marathon. —Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff

Marcel Hug wins third straight Boston Marathon men’s wheelchair race

Marcel Hug (HOOG) has won the wheelchair race at the Boston Marathon in a course record time.

It was the third straight Boston win for the 32-year-old from Switzerland. Read more. 

—Associated Press

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Workers make final preparations to the finish line. —AP Photo/Elise Amendola

The finish line is finally ready to greet an expected 30,159 marathoners

As runners cross the starting line in Hopkinton, the Boston Marathon finish line awaits.

The finish line received one last cleaning Monday morning ahead of being crossed by the 30,074 registered marathon runners and 85 wheelchairs and handcycles. Read more.

—Nik DeCosta-Klipa

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Carlos Arredondo with runners outside the Public Garden on April 17, 2017. —@RoadTripNE/Twitter

Runners got a send off at Public Garden from the man in the cowboy hat

Carlos Arredondo, who rushed to help people injured during the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings, greeted runners boarding buses to the starting line Marathon Monday with a big thumbs up and a “Boston Strong” banner. Read more.

—Dialynn Dwyer

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A field of elite women runners make their way along the course in Ashland. —Keith Bedford/Globe Staff

Boston Marathon runners get tailwind at start

Runners in the Boston Marathon had high temperatures to deal with.

But they also got a strong tailwind that could help, too. Read more.

—Jimmy Golen, AP

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The elite female runners break from the starting line. —AP Photo/Mary Schwalm

Elite women set off in 121st Boston Marathon

BOSTON (AP) — The elite women are on their way in the 121st running of the Boston Marathon.

The field started at 9:32 a.m. They’ll be followed at 10 a.m. by the elite men. Read more.

—Associated Press

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Workers prepare the starting line. — Bill Greene / The Boston Globe

The Boston Marathon is underway

The 121st running of the Boston Marathon is getting underway in waves for the 30,000 athletes.

Mobility impaired athletes — the blind and those with prostheses or other challenges — started at 8:50 a.m. Monday.

They were followed by the men’s push rim wheelchair athletes at 9:17 a.m., and the women two minutes later. Read more.

—Associated Press

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Kathrine Switzer prepares to fire the gun to start the women’s elite division. —Mary Schwalm/AP

15 runners barred from Boston Marathon were identified by race sleuth

The Boston Marathon hasn’t even begun, and several runners have already been disqualified.

The Boston Athletic Association said it barred fifteen runners from this year’s race based on evidence from a racing sleuth in Ohio, Runner’s World reports. Read more.

—The Boston Globe

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A runner sleeps at the athlete’s village before the start of the 121st Boston Marathon. —Keith Bedford/Globe Staff

Scenes from the starting line of the 2017 Boston Marathon

Run, Boston, run! The sunny scene at the starting line at the 121st Boston Marathon in Hopkinton on Monday morning was one of preparation and anticipation as runners prepared to begin their 26.2 mile trek. From the athlete’s village to prepping the course, there was action at every angle. Read more.

—Marisa Dellatto

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Jared Ward explains his thesis to students and fellow runners in Boston on Friday, April 14. —Via Doug Levy

One of America’s best marathoners will test his thesis about marathon pacing in Boston

Jared Ward is not your typical 28-year-old. Not only is Ward a member of the BYU faculty, but he’s also an elite distance runner who finished sixth in the Rio Olympic marathon. As a professor of statistics, Ward has found a way to combine his academic and athletic interests. His thesis topic was a fitting one: statistical analysis of marathon pacing.

Ward is making his Boston Marathon debut in 2017. Finally, the timing was right. Read more.

—Hayden Bird

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A cyclist rides over the newly applied Boston Marathon finish line on Boylston Street on April 13, 2017. —Steven Senne/AP

A warm and sunny day is on tap for Marathon Monday

The 121st running of the Boston Marathon will be a warm and sunny one, with highs in the lower 70s – perfect weather for spectators, but a bit on the warm side for runners pounding 26.2 miles of pavement.

Temperatures were already in the mid-60s by about 8 a.m. as runners descended upon the race course. It will be mostly sunny all day, with highs ranging from 64 degrees in Hopkinton to 73 degrees at the finish line. Read more.

—David Epstein

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Meb Keflezighi waves during a Boston Marathon media availability on April 14, 2017. —Bill Sikes/AP

121st Boston Marathon is Meb’s last run, Rupp’s first

BOSTON (AP) — Meb Keflezighi’s last Boston Marathon. Galen Rupp’s first. Two defending champions on the women’s side (sort of), and Lemi Berhanu Hayle returns to go for his second straight men’s title.

Also: puppies!

The 121st edition of the Boston Marathon will leave Hopkinton on Monday morning for the 26.2-mile trek to Copley Square, with more than 30,000 runners expected to line up with partly cloudy skies and temperatures in the mid-60s — a little warmer than the competitors would like. But a tailwind gusting up to 30 mph could mean fast times, at least among the elite runners who would finish before the hottest part of the day. Read more.

—Jimmy Golen, AP

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The Boston Marathon finish line is prepared for Monday. —Via BAA

The Boston Marathon finish line is ready to go

One of the annual traditions in the buildup to the Boston Marathon is the installment of the finish line. It’s a ritual that evokes excitement in the days before the event.

On Thursday, race organizers set up the 2017 finish line on Boylston Street. Read more.

—Hayden Bird

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Kathrine Switzer gets confronted by race director Jock Semple during the 1967 Boston Marathon. —Walter Iooss Jr. / Sports Illustrated / Getty Images

Boston Marathon retires Bib No. 261 in honor of Kathrine Switzer

BOSTON (AP) — The Boston Marathon will retire Bib No. 261 in honor of Kathrine Switzer.

The Boston Athletic Association said Thursday it will no longer assign the number that Switzer wore in 1967 when she became the first woman to officially enter the race. Read more.

—Associated Press

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Family members of Boston Marathon bombing victim Martin Richard, from left, Denise, Jane, Bill, and Henry Richard, arrive to place a wreath during a ceremony on April 15, 2017. —Michael Dwyer/AP

Boston marks 4th anniversary of deadly marathon bombing

BOSTON (AP) — Bostonians marked the fourth anniversary of the deadly Boston Marathon attacks on Saturday with quiet remembrances for the victims.

Bill Richard placed a large wreath on the Boylston Street sidewalk where his 8-year-old son, Martin, died. The boy was one of the three spectators killed when two bombs planted near the finish line exploded on April 15, 2013, spraying shrapnel into the crowds. More than 260 others were wounded. Read more.

—Associated Press