Running icon Kathrine Switzer on empowering women: ‘We have a long way to go’

“We are here to change the life of women."

Kathrine Switzer, who was the first official woman entrant in the Boston Marathon 50 years ago, acknowledges the crowd as she is introduced before firing the gun to start the women's elite division at the start of the 2017 Boston Marathon in Hopkinton, Mass., Monday, April 17, 2017. (AP Photo/Mary Schwalm)
Kathrine Switzer acknowledges the crowd as she is introduced before firing the gun to start the women's elite division at the start of the 2017 Boston Marathon in Hopkinton. –Mary Schwalm / AP

Kathrine Switzer may have just crossed the finish line but she’s already focused on the road ahead.

After she completed the Boston Marathon Monday, 50 years after she made history as the first woman with an official bib number, 261, to run the race, Switzer took to social media to thank those who supported her.

The 70-year-old shared a video from the nonprofit she founded, 261 Fearless, which is dedicated to empowering women through running.

“I finished, like I did 50 years ago,” she wrote. “We are here to change the life of women. Just imagine what’s gonna happen in 50 years!”

When Switzer ran the Boston Marathon in 1967, she entered using just her initials. While she was running, the race director attempted to physically remove her from the race. The Boston Athletic Association officially retired bib No. 261 in her honor.

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Switzer said in an interview with CNN Monday that her organization aims to focus for the next 50 years on helping to empower women without opportunities.

 “We have a long way to go in terms of equal pay, scholarships, opportunities, and in many countries, women don’t have any opportunities whatsoever,” Switzer said, when asked about sexism in athletics. 

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