More and more players practicing what Ted Williams preached

Nationals' Daniel Murphy (20) bats against the Mets during a spring training game Saturday, Feb. 25, 2017, in Port St. Lucie, Fla.
Nationals' Daniel Murphy (20) bats against the Mets during a spring training game Saturday, Feb. 25, 2017, in Port St. Lucie, Fla. –AP Photo/David J. Phillip

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FORT MYERS, Fla. – Ted Williams wrote “The Science of Hitting” with John Underwood in 1970. Almost 50 years later, concepts articulated in that tome are getting a new audience that is embracing ever-more scientific demonstrations of its tenets.

The Red Sox great believed that players should have a slight upper cut at the point of contact with the intention of launching the ball to the nether regions of the field. As ideas such as exit velocity and launch angle spread throughout the game, some players, hitting coaches, and even teams are starting to embrace some of Williams’ views as gospel.

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