Morning Sports Update

Chaim Bloom said the Red Sox remain ‘engaged’ in effort to re-sign Xander Bogaerts

"It’s not for me to decide or announce what’s competitive or what isn’t."

Xander Bogaerts
Xander Bogaerts in Oct. during a Red Sox-Rays game. Jim Davis/Globe Staff

The Bruins’ home win streak to begin the season ended at 14 games following a 4-3 shootout loss to the Golden Knights on Monday. Former Boston coach Bruce Cassidy returned and former Boston player Reilly Smith scored the winner for Las Vegas.

The Celtics held on to defeat the Raptors 116-110 on Monday. Jayson Tatum led Boston with 31 points.

Chaim Bloom’s update from the Winter Meetings: The MLB Winter Meetings are in full swing, though Red Sox fans are still wondering what the team’s offseason plans will amount to.

Xander Bogaerts, who Red Sox Chief Baseball Officer Chaim Bloom has maintained is the team’s “first choice” at shortstop, remains a free agent after opting out of his contract in November. Still, Bloom said Boston’s thought process on Bogaerts hasn’t changed. He’s still “Option A.”

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“We felt that way then and we still feel that way,” Bloom told reporters on Monday. “As you guys know, we engage with him extensively right away. Made some offers. It was clear he was going to fully explore the market, that he wanted to fully explore the market, and like I said, we respect that.”

Boston Globe Red Sox writer Peter Abraham reported on Sunday that Boston has not made Bogaerts a “competitive offer.”

“It’s not for me to decide or announce what’s competitive or what isn’t,” Bloom replied when asked about the team’s offer to Bogaerts. “We’ve certainly made offers to him and we’ve certainly been engaged and we’re going to stay engaged.”

More from Boston.com:

David Pastrnak makes it look easy:

Tom Brady once again orchestrated a comeback: Trailing 16-3 in the fourth quarter, Brady led the Buccaneers to a remarkable rally. His touchdown pass to Rachaad White with three seconds remaining (and the ensuing extra point) gave Tampa Bay a miraculous 17-16 win.

On this day: In 1956, Hungary defeated the Soviet Union in an Olympic water polo match that became infamously known as “Blood in the Water” for the way it ended.

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Played amid a backdrop of conflict — only weeks earlier, Soviet tanks rolled into Budapest to crush the Hungarian Revolution — the game was also a contest of two of the better water polo teams at the Melbourne Olympics in Australia.

The Hungarians, defending Olympic champions, were on course to repeat. The Soviets would draw level in the standings with an upset win.

In a game that was dominated by physicality (and illegality, with five players being ejected by the referee), Hungary was still able to seize a 4-0 lead.

Ervin Zador, scorer of two of Hungary’s goals, was on track to realize his Olympic dream. But in the final moments of the game, Soviet player Valentin Prokopov hit Zador in the face, causing him to start bleeding profusely.

“I saw about 4,000 stars. And I reached to my face and I felt warm blood pouring down,” Zador told the BBC. Fans and Hungarian officials reacted angrily to Prokopov, and eventually the match was abandoned with Hungary having secured the vital win.

In the final match, Hungary defeated Yugoslavia 2-1 to win gold. Yet the clash with the Soviets (and the wound he sustained at the end) meant that Zador couldn’t play in the final.

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“I sat through it and that was the hardest one hour of my life,” he said of the deciding game.

Zador, like several players from that team, did not return to Hungary after the Olympics. He moved to the United States, where he eventually became a coach (with Mark Spitz among his future students).

Here’s a photo of Zador (and Prokopov) in the Boston Globe account from Dec. 7, 1956:

Ervin Zador Hungary 1956

Daily highlight: Showing their skill and teamwork, Brazil scored a beautiful goal in the 4-1 Round of 16 World Cup win against South Korea on Monday. Richarlison finished the move he’d begun and celebrated with his coach (continuing a theme of Brazilian dancing).

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