Magic Johnson says Pelicans didn’t act in good faith during Anthony Davis trade talks

"The more they wanted, the more it became outrageous and unrealistic."

Lakers 76ers
Los Angeles Lakers president of basketball operations Earvin "Magic" Johnson looks on during the first half. –AP Photo/Chris Szagola

The reported developments, or lack thereof at times, in the fruitless Lakers-Pelicans talks over a potential Anthony Davis trade caused some speculation about whether New Orleans was just stringing Los Angeles along ahead of Thursday’s NBA trade deadline. One person buying into that view of events is Magic Johnson.

The Lakers’ team president was asked Sunday whether he thought the Pelicans had acted in good faith during the negotiations over their All-Star big man. “No,” he replied.

Johnson’s team had already offered indications that it was frustrated at its dealings with New Orleans, which appeared to alternate between demanding greater packages from the Lakers and not communicating at all. A few days before the deadline, a source told the Los Angeles Times, the Pelicans “wanted more and more and more. There was no more to give. They had cap relief with Solomon Hill being in the deal.

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“But the more they wanted, the more it became outrageous and unrealistic.”

Around the same time, ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski reported, the Lakers were “still glad to engage with the Pelicans on an Anthony Davis trade, but no longer want to bid against themselves” and were “waiting for (the) Pelicans to make a counterproposal.” Wojnarowski followed with a report that New Orleans’ general manager, Dell Demps, was having “no communication” with Johnson and, hours before the deadline passed, he reported that talks were “dormant,” adding that the “Pelicans seem content to run out the clock.”

The speculation about New Orleans’ intentions regarding its talks with the Lakers sprung from a widespread suspicion that Davis had been tampered with by Los Angeles star LeBron James through their mutual agent, Rich Paul. A longtime friend of James, Paul incurred a $50,000 fine for Davis late last month after making it public knowledge that the latter wanted to be traded away from New Orleans; the Lakers quickly emerging in reports as his preferred destination.

James had raised eyebrows, and not just the one(s) on Davis’ well-known visage, when he declared in December that it would be “amazing” and “incredible” to have Davis as a teammate in Los Angeles. After James selected the Pelicans star during Thursday’s NBA All-Star Game draft, the Bucks’ Giannis Antetokounmpo jokingly asked, “Isn’t that tampering?”

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Under Johnson’s leadership, the Lakers have been fined twice in the past two years for tampering, for a total of $550,000. On Sunday, Johnson invited more scrutiny over his adherence to league rules when he said 76ers point guard Ben Simmons, another client of Paul, “reached out” out to the Lakers to see if he could “get together” with Johnson and learn some point guard techniques from the Hall of Famer.

“I said, ‘Hey, you got to clear it with the league,’ and if everybody – the Sixers sign off, we sign off, the league signs off – fine, I will do that,” Johnson said. “But if everybody doesn’t sign off, then we can’t get together.

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“But I love (Simmons’) game, I love his vision, I love also, too, he’s very, in terms of basketball IQ, very high basketball IQ.”

During the talks with the Pelicans, reports emerged that Los Angeles had offered essentially all of its young talent, with some observers viewing that as a ploy by New Orleans to foment discontent and dissension in the Lakers’ locker room. Johnson, though, downplayed that angle Sunday and asserted that his players needed to learn how to handle seeing their names bandied about in trade rumors.

“All deals are . . . a lot of them are made in public,” Johnson said, according to ESPN. “We didn’t make it in public, but that’s part of it. That’s what happens, man. We’ve got big boys here, and they bounce back. They’re fine.”

The possibility of a Davis trade was a major talking point in NBA circles, and it seemed to affect the Lakers two days before the deadline, when they suffered a 42-point loss to the Pacers that was the biggest deficit of James’ career and included him appearing to keep his distance from his teammates. However, hours after the deadline passed, Los Angeles got a stirring road victory over the Celtics, only to get drubbed again Sunday, this time in Philadelphia.

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Speaking before the game against the 76ers, Johnson said of his young players to reporters, “Quit making this about thinking these guys are babies, because that’s what you’re treating them like. They’re professionals. All of them. And this is how this league works. They know it, I know it, that’s how it goes.”

Johnson said he spoke with his players “individually” while they were on the road trip, which ends Tuesday with a game at Atlanta before the All-Star break, because he wanted to “make sure that we’re heading all in the same direction.” He added that while it was “the nature of our business” for “young guys” to be “affected” by trade rumors, he reiterated his stance that it was important for them to handle the uncertainty with focus and professionalism.

“I’m not the guy who, ‘Oh, I’m going to up and hug guys.’ I’m not that dude,” Johnson said, according to USA Today. “And they’re ready to go, so let’s not belabor that point, like all of a sudden everybody’s upset over maybe being traded, maybe not.”

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