Why hasn’t Bill Belichick worn ‘Salute to Service’ apparel?

Bill Belichick on the sidelines late in the fourth quarter against the Giants.
Bill Belichick on the sidelines late in the fourth quarter against the Giants. –Barry Chin/The Boston Globe

Bill Belichick grew up at the United States Naval Academy, where his father Steve was a football coach. He’s a noted military history buff.

But Belichick is one of two NFL head coaches who hasn’t worn “Salute to Service’’ apparel or headwear this season. In the last two weeks, NFL coaches have worn camoflauge hats, headsets and jackets as part of the league’s tribute to the men and women who serve in the United States military.

The Belichick observation was first made by ESPN.com’s Mike Reiss last week:

While most other head coaches either wore camouflage headsets or sweatshirts on the sideline during Week 9 games as part of the NFL’s “Salute to Service’’ campaign, Belichick did not. The coach who has made the cut-sleeves gray hoodie a fashion statement in New England did his part by putting an NFL-themed pin about halfway down the left side of his plain blue Patriots light jacket. When I see things like that, I often wonder the reaction of the folks at NFL headquarters, and also how Belichick — a big military supporter — seems to take some pleasure in being a nonconformist.

Not all coaches have been uniform in their participation in the program. Andy Reid and Gary Kubiak just wore the headset. But only Belichick and Houston coach Bill O’Brien haven’t worn either the headset or clothing, instead sporting a camoflauge pin with the NFL logo on it.

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Belichick’s decision to forgo the apparel was debated on WEEI’s Dennis & Callahan Show Tuesday, with the hosts and callers speculating on Belichick’s reasons for passing. When asked Tuesday morning why Belichick was not participating, a Patriots spokesman did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The proceeds for the “Salute to Service’’ campaign go to the USO, Pat Tillman Foundation, and Wounded Warrior Project, according to NFL.com.

h/t — TheBigLead.com

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