Tony Romo was predicting plays again during the Patriots game

The former Cowboys quarterback has made quite a first impression in the broadcast booth.

Former NFL quarterback Tony Romo leaves the broadcast booth after appearing on air during the third round of the Dean & DeLuca Invitational golf tournament at Colonial Country Club in Fort Worth, Texas, Saturday, May 27, 2017. The former Dallas Cowboys quarterback, hired last month to be the network's lead NFL analyst, was on the air Saturday for a few minutes during the coverage of the PGA Tour event at Colonial. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
Former NFL quarterback Tony Romo leaves the broadcast booth after appearing on air during a golf tournament in May. –LM Otero / AP

Tony Romo is at it again.

In his broadcasting debut last week, the former Dallas Cowboys quarterback displayed a certain prescient penchant for calling plays before they happened.

In Sunday’s game between the Patriots and Saints, it was more of the same. Calling the game with Jim Nantz, Romo showed why CBS decided to make him the network’s lead color commentator. From the Saints’ second quarter touchdown to their fourth-down attempts (one in which they tried to draw the Patriots offsides and another where they actually went for it), Romo appeared almost clairvoyant.

So far, his ability to see inside Bill Belichick’s mind has been less pronounced. However, the former quarterback proved effective in identifying formations and explaining plays.

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Before the game, Romo admitted he knew Saints coach and former Cowboys coordinator Sean Payton pretty well. Belichick less so.

“He may or may not actually say a word in his production meeting,” Romo said of Belichick during the pregame show. “So you got to be prepared for him to look at you awkwardly for 30 seconds straight. But he was warm. He was great.”

Romo replaced CBS’s much-derided lead analyst Phil Simms after retiring this offseason. Two weeks into his second career, he’s getting mostly rave reviews from his peers in the sports media world.