Sports Q: What’s the most egregious call in Boston sports history?

Debate the answer with Chad Finn and other Boston sports fans at The Sports Q.

New York Giants receiver David Tyree catches a pass from quarterback Eli Manning against his helmet during Super Bowl XLII.
New York Giants receiver David Tyree catches a pass from quarterback Eli Manning against his helmet during Super Bowl XLII. –AP

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What’s the most egregious call/non-call in Boston sports history? – Scott R.

Wow, this is a good one. I can think of several candidates off the top of my head, and one obvious choice as the best answer. First, the runners-up:

  • Umpire Larry Barnett’s failure to call interference on the Reds’ Ed Armbrister during Game 3 of the 1975 World Series.  Armbrister got in Sox catcher Carlton Fisk’s way during a bunt in the 10th inning. Fisk threw the ball away, and the Reds eventually won, 6-5.
  • Chuck Knoblauch’s phantom tag on Jose Offerman with the Sox down a run in the eighth inning of Game 4 of the 1999 ALCS. Twenty-one years later, Knoblauch still hasn’t come within a yard of tagging Offerman, but on that night it was ruled he had, and a promising rally turned into an inning-ending double play.
  • Ben Dreith’s roughing the passer penalty on the Patriots’ Sugar Bear Hamilton in the 1976 playoff game with the Raiders. The Tuck Rule – the correct interpretation of a stupid rule – almost made up for it.
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Those are the (dis)honorable mentions. The easy choice, given what was at stake, was the failure to call the multiple holding penalties on Giants offensive linemen as Eli Manning scrambled around before heaving a prayer to David Tyree in Super Bowl XLII. Richard Seymour and Jarvis Green were both blatantly held, but the officials all gulped down their whistles at the same time.

They should have been 19-0, dammit.

But what does everyone else think? What’s the most egregious call/non-call in Boston sports history? I’ll hear you in the comments.

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