Flights

Logan Airport ranked No. 17 in an annual airport satisfaction study

The 2022 J.D. Power study examined terminal facilities, baggage claim, food, beverage, retail, and other factors.

Erin Clark/Globe Staff
People waited in line to check their bags at Logan International Airport on Christmas Day. Erin Clark/Globe Staff

Logan International Airport may be leaving customers unsatisfied, according to a J.D. Power 2022 North America Airport Satisfaction Study, released on Wednesday.

Overall customer satisfaction with North American airports fell 25 points to 777 (based on a 1,000-point scale) this year due in part to fewer flights and more crowded terminals, according to the report. However, some airports did a better job of satisfying customers than others.

Logan Airport ranked 17th out of the 20 mega airports ranked in the study, defined as airports with 33 million or more passengers per year. Last year, Boston ranked 18th.

“The J.D. Power report is a valuable tool that helps us gauge how passengers feel about their overall experience at Logan Airport,” a Massport official said in a statement to Boston.com. “We are in the midst of several construction projects aimed at improving our aging facilities and infrastructure to meet the future needs of travelers, and we appreciate our passengers’ patience as we work to finish these projects. … Logan is also undergoing roadway improvements to streamline traffic flow and reduce emissions. The feedback from the survey is very useful to us as we continue to make investments to support economic growth, facilitate connections, increase efficiency, and create a smoother, more enjoyable travel experience for our passengers.”

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The No. 1 airport for customer satisfaction on the mega airport list is Minneapolis-Saint Paul International Airport, with a score of 800 out of 1,000. Logan Airport earned a score of 754. The only airports that scored worse than Logan were Los Angeles International Airport at 753, O’Hare International Airport at 751, and Newark Liberty International Airport at 719.

Traveler satisfaction was determined by examining six factors (in order of importance): terminal facilities; airport arrival/departure; baggage claim; security check; check-in/baggage check; and food, beverage, and retail.

More than half of travelers said airports were severely or moderately crowded, nearly one-fourth of travelers complained that airport food was too expensive, and a shortage of space in parking lots caused parking satisfaction to drop 45 points from last year, according to the study.

“The combination of pent-up demand for air travel, the nationwide labor shortage and steadily rising prices on everything from jet fuel to a bottle of water have created a scenario in which airports are extremely crowded and passengers are increasingly frustrated — and it is likely to continue through 2023,” said Michael Taylor, travel intelligence lead at J.D. Power, in a statement. “In some ways, this is a return to normal as larger crowds at airports tend to make travelers more frazzled, but in cases where parking lots are over capacity,
gates are standing room only and restaurants and bars are not even open to offer some reprieve, it is clear that increased capacity in airports can’t come soon enough.”

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The study, now in its 17th year, was based on 26,529 surveys of departure and arrival experiences (including connecting airports) completed by U.S. or Canadian residents who traveled through at least one U.S. or Canadian airport and was conducted between August 2021 and July 2022.

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