New England Travel

These are the best ski resorts in Vermont, according to Conde Nast Traveler

Vermont is "one of the East Coast's most idyllic winter wonderlands," the publication wrote.

Skiers at Vermont’s Okemo Mountain Resort. Brian Mohr/Ember Photography/Okemo

Vermont is well-known for its many excellent ski resorts, but six in particular are “the best of the best,” according to Conde Nast Traveler.

The top ski resorts in Vermont are: Jay Peak, Killington Resort, Okemo Mountain, Saskadena Six, Sugarbush, and Stowe, according to the travel publication.

Conde Nast Traveler called Vermont “one of the East Coast’s most idyllic winter wonderlands,” writing: “Think fresh powder, picturesque peaks, and more maple syrup than you can handle.”

Jay Peak “has pine forests, powder for days, and some of the best ski terrain on the East Coast,” according to Conde Nast Traveler.

At Killington Resort, skiers have access to “gentle” runs as well as steep mogul trails across six mountains, a giant half-pipe, six terrain parks, and more.

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The family-friendly Okemo Mountain has a superpipe and eight terrain parks perfect for freestylers, the publication wrote, and one-third of the runs are green.

Saskadena Six, formerly known as Suicide Six, has a new name and so much history.

“Though small and one of the lesser-known in Vermont, Saskadena Six’s claim to fame is that it hosts the longest-running ski race in North America: The Fisk Trophy Race, founded in 1937, has been won by Olympians like Bode Miller, and other celebrated skiers,” the publication wrote.

Sugarbush, one of the biggest ski resorts in New England, has plenty of variety, Conde Nast Traveler noted, including the forests of Slide Brook and Mount Ellen, one of the highest peaks in the state.

Stowe, the birthplace of alpine skiing in Vermont, is comprised of Spruce Peak and Mount Mansfield.

“More than half of the resort’s runs are intermediate, making this the ideal spot for those looking to perfect their technique and log some miles on mellow runs,” Conde Nast Traveler wrote.

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