This New England ski and snowboard guide will help you plan your next trip

Where will you hit the slopes this year?

Stowe
Stowe Mountain in Stowe, Vermont. –Stowe

The 2019-20 ski and snowboard season is underway, which means New England is full of opportunities to hit the slopes.

Ahead, discover what’s new at five of the top regional mountains, how long it will take you to get there, how much a lift ticket will cost you, and more. It’s worth noting that lift tickets are often less expensive when purchased online in advance.

Killington Ski Resort in Killington, Vermont

The high-speed Snowdon Six Express at Killington in Vermont, one of the resort’s improvements from last year. —Killington

Date opened: Nov. 3
Distance from Boston: About three hours by car
Size of mountain: Six peaks, 1,509 skiable acres, and 155 trails. Here’s a map.
Ticket cost: $89 and up per adult ticket until the resort is 100 percent open, according to Killington. The resort says it expects to start charging full price by Dec. 13, which is $125 on non-peak days and $130 on peak days (Nov. 28-Dec. 1, 2019; Dec. 21, 2019-Jan. 1, 2020; Jan. 18-20, 2020; Feb. 15-23, 2020). A ticket to Killington also includes access to Pico Mountain.
Largest vertical drop: 3,050 feet
Number of lifts: 22
What’s new this season: Killington has a new Woodward Mountain Park, as well as a new quad lift which replaced the previous North Ridge Triple.

Sunday River in Newry, Maine

Sunday River —Sunday River
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Date opened: Nov. 9
Distance from Boston: About three hours by car
Size of mountain: Eight peaks, 870 skiable acres, and 135 trails. Here’s a map.
Ticket cost: $109 per adult
Largest vertical drop: 2,340 feet
Number of lifts: 18
What’s new this season: Sunday River has increased snowmaking capacity by 10 percent and installed four new surface lifts: one dedicated to competitions, and three dedicated to accessing beginner terrain.

Sugarloaf in Carrabassett Valley, Maine

Sugarloaf —Sugarloaf

Opening date: Nov. 15
Distance from Boston: About five hours by car
Size of mountain: 1,240 skiable acres, 162 trails and glades. Here’s a map.
Ticket cost: $105 per adult
Largest vertical drop: 2,820 feet
Number of lifts: 13
What’s new this season: Over the summer, the resort renovated its signature watering hole The Widowmaker at the top of the base lodge, relocating the bar and stage, increasing seating, and nearly doubling the tap capacity.

Stowe Mountain Resort in Stowe, Vermont

Stowe —Stowe

Opening date: Nov. 22
Distance from Boston: About three hours by car
Size of mountain: 485 skiable acres and 116 trails. Here’s a map.
Ticket cost: $110 per adult
Largest vertical drop: 2,360 feet
Number of lifts: 13
What’s new this season: Stowe created new on-mountain Adventure Zones, which are well-signed gladed areas adjacent to the primary trails and located on low-angle areas of the mountain. The area provides an entry-level experience for people who’d like to start skiing in the trees and more side-country options as well.

Mad River Glen in Fayston, Vermont

Mad River Glen’s famous single chair lift. —Caleb Kenna
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Projected opening date: Dec. 14, but could be sooner weather permitting
Distance from Boston: About three and half hours by car
Size of mountain: 115 acres of trails, plus 800 acres of tree skiing/riding access. Here’s a map.
Ticket cost: $92 per adult
Largest vertical drop: 2,037 feet
Number of lifts: Five
What’s new this season: Over the past three years Mad River Glen has invested in a new snowmaking infrastructure and $5.5 million in donations will be spent toward future mountain operations and infrastructure upgrades. Expect smoother trails and an improved ski experience this year.

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