These types of face coverings will not be allowed on American Airlines flights beginning next week

The new policy begins Aug. 19.

A pair of American Airlines jets are parked on the airport apron in Miami.
A pair of American Airlines jets parked at the airport in Miami. –AP Photo / Wilfredo Lee

Before you catch your next American Airlines flight at Logan International Airport, you’ll want to double check your face covering.

The Fort Worth, Texas-based airline updated its face covering policy on Wednesday, announcing that certain coverings are no longer allowed beginning Aug. 19 because they can potentially spread COVID-19.

The airline, which mandated face coverings in May, is now banning coverings with exhaust valves or vents, as well as coverings made with mesh or lace, according to the press release. The concern, according to the airline, is that such face coverings allow exhaled air to get through holes in the material.

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“Wearing a face covering is a responsibility we all share,” said Alison Taylor, chief customer officer at American, in a statement. “An effective covering, worn properly, is one of the best ways we can control the spread of COVID-19 to protect our team members and customers. Since American began requiring face coverings in early May, the vast majority of customers have welcomed our continuing efforts to strengthen the policy based on the CDC’s guidance.”

In July, American announced only passengers under age 2 are exempt from the face covering policy. The face coverings must be worn in the airport, as well as onboard the aircraft, and those unwilling to wear them may be denied boarding or barred from future travel, according to the airline. Customers without an approved face covering can request one at the airport, noted the airline.

Here is the breakdown of what is and is not allowed when it comes to face coverings, according to American:

Allowed:

A well-secured cloth or mask that fits snugly against the face and covers an individual’s nose and mouth. It must be made of a material that prevents the discharge and release of respiratory droplets from a person’s nose or mouth.

Not allowed:

Face coverings with exhaust valves.

Face coverings made with materials such as mesh or lace fabrics.

Face coverings that do not cover the nose and mouth.

Face shields without the addition of a face covering.

 


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