The best camping spot in each New England state, according to Conde Nast Traveler

They are all public lands.

The new yurts on Peddocks — accessible by ferry from piers in Quincy, Hingham, and Hull — are part of a plan to attract more visitors to the island and turn it into a camping mecca for all ages and levels of experience, from seasoned survivalists to novice backpackers. Camping is offered as an official activity at four harbor islands: Grape, Bumpkin, Peddocks, and Lovells.Pictured: The chapel at Peddocks Island, built in 1941
Peddocks Island, part of the Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area. –Emily Sweeney for the Boston Globe

Travelers looking for camping inspiration close to home this season due to the coronavirus pandemic have excellent options across New England, according to Conde Nast Traveler.

The publication recently released a list of best camping spots in every state, sticking with public lands that are bookable through the national or state parks system.

“[T]his summer, when it seems like we’re all heading camping — and we mean everyone — many of us are limited to staying closer to home, and in need of a little more domestic travel inspiration,” the publication wrote.

Ahead are the publication’s picks for New England and what editors had to say about each place. (Please note: Massachusetts entry Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area is not allowing camping during the 2020 season due to the global health crisis. The rest of the publication’s picks are open this season.)

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Connecticut: Rocky Neck State Park

“It’s true — swimming in the Long Island Sound, fishing for saltwater bass, and hiking among marshland waterfowl can all be found less than an hour drive from New Haven. After a day spent lounging on white sand beaches, stargaze right from your tent, while serenaded by the pops and crackles of the campfire.”

Maine: Blackwoods Campground, Acadia National Park
“Snuggled into a lush forest of spruce and hemlock, Blackwoods Campground provides a centrally located shady solace for adventure seekers in Acadia. Climb Cadillac Mountain for a spectacular sunrise show, dip your feet into the water at Sand Beach, and marvel at the craggy coastal headland of Otter Point.”
Massachusetts: Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area
“After a quick ferry ride from Boston, campers can revel in the wildflowers, tidepools, and sandy shores of the Boston Harbor Islands. They’re a history lesson by day, too: Explore Civil War-era Fort Warren, before retreating to a hidden beach campsite on Lovells Island.”
New Hampshire: Lafayette Place Campground, Franconia Notch State Park
“Easily one of the best spots for leaf-peeping in October, Franconia Notch is also a brilliant summer destination for hikers looking to hop onto a stretch of the Appalachian Trail and traverse the Franconia Ridge. Set right on the banks of the Pemigewasset River, this forested campground is as close as you can get to those scenic White Mountain trails as well.”
Rhode Island: Charlestown Breachway
“To overnight at Charlestown Breachway, campers will need their own ‘self-contained rig’ (that’s a motorhome in layman’s terms). It’s a steep price of admission, but it allows RV owners, renters, and avid van-lifers a front row seat to some of the best saltwater fishing in the country. All sites are within walking distance to a sandy beach, providing breathtaking views of Block Island Sound.”
Vermont: Mount Philo State Park
“Just minutes south of Burlington sits Vermont’s first state park, Mount Philo. This unpretentious woodland setting is a summertime favorite for birders, picnickers, and hikers looking to summit its namesake 968-foot peak. Gaze out at impeccable views of the Lake Champlain Valley and Adirondack Mountains from the top.”
View the entire list of best places to camp in every state.

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